expound

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expound

((up)on someone or something) (to someone) to speak at length about someone or something to someone. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) Let me expound upon Tom to you for a while. I think you need all the details on his qualifications. Please do not expound on Bill anymore.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wigmore, as the classic expounder of evidentiary theory, clearly believes that there is much to be lost by denying the admissibility of dying declaration hearsay.
Even the original expounders of modern natural law expected this result.
He writes, "In their novels, or at least in their most 'Catholic' novels, such writers were explorers, if not necessarily expounders, of their faith, illustrating the dramas and tensions of the truths of their religion seen in an existential and human context in all its confusion and messiness" (17).
bar]--may God make his afterlife good--presents to you, 0 brothers of mysticism, and expounds for you, O brothers of retreat and solitude, a solution to the confusion caused in you by the mass of teachers attempting to reveal the difficult relationship between the Eternal and the incipient, and [aims] to ease its difficulties with clear thought according to the method of Greek philosophy and of Yemeni philosophy, and to investigate the discourse of those expounders and make them wither with firm writing and forthright exposition.
As the colossus among the early expounders of St Paul, he dominated the Reformation.
Case's obituary noted his 'prominent place amongst the pictorial expounders of Labor's doctrines and ideals':
The expounders of novel solutions arc, more often than not, considered to be on the lunatic fringe by the brass and the supporting staff.
The great expounders of modern liberalism, like John Stuart Mill, were right to value what they valued--but they were wrong to imagine that a healthy form of individualism could blossom anywhere without reference to social organization.
In fact, some expounders of the quantity theory ignore altogether the demand for money, and proceed on the assumption that it is only the supply that counts.
is a very unruly horse and when once you get astride it you never know where it will carry you," (7) and that judges are more to be trusted as interpreters of the law than as expounders of public policy.
This class also included religious functionaries: judges, official expounders of Islamic law (muftis), leaders in public prayer (imams), deliverers of sermon in public prayer (khatibs) and others.
But unlike so many partisan critics of conservatism who are only too happy to define conservatism by and dilate upon its worst moments, Allitt, without sweeping its lapses and bad tendencies under the rug, seeks to understand conservatism in light of its most thoughtful expounders and influential practitioners.
most eloquent expounders of Jewish liberation theology, has noted that
In choosing the statute (Loi) over the common law to protect their rights, as was the case in the Monarchical Age, the French abandoned the old medieval tradition of justice as sovereign expounders of the law.
S]o numerous and complex are the laws by which the rights and duties of citizens are governed, so important is it that they should be permitted to avail themselves of the superior skill and learning of those who are sanctioned by the law as its ministers and expounders, both in ascertaining their rights in the country, and maintaining them most safely in courts, without publishing those facts, which they have a right to keep secret, but which must be disclosed to a legal adviser and advocate, to enable him successfully to perform the duties of his office, that the law has considered it the wisest policy to encourage and sanction this confidence, by requiring that on such facts the mouth of the attorney shall be for ever sealed.