expense


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pad (one's)/the expense account

To make unnecessary or fraudulent charges to one's company expense accounts for one's personal use. Have you been padding your expense account, Johnson? You're going to have to explain some of these mysterious out-of-state charges.
See also: account, expense, pad

at (one's) expense

1. One's financial responsibility. Once I learned that the trip was at my expense, I decided not to go.
2. To one's detriment or disadvantage. I was furious when I heard the other kids telling jokes at my little brother's expense.
See also: expense

at the expense of

1. The financial responsibility of (a particular person or group). Once I learned that the trip was at the expense of my department, I decided to go.
2. To the detriment or disadvantage of (someone). I was furious when I heard the other kids telling jokes at the expense of my little brother.
See also: expense, of

no expense is spared

As much money as necessary is spent to do something the best or most extravagant way possible. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. This is our company's 50th anniversary celebration, so no expense will be spared! Wow, their parents threw a great dinner party. You could tell that no expense was spared.
See also: expense, spare

spare no expense

To spend as much money as necessary is spent to do something the best or most extravagant way possible. This is our company's 50th anniversary celebration, so we're sparing no expense. Wow, their parents threw a great dinner party. You could tell that they spared no expense.
See also: expense, spare

go to the trouble

To make the effort to do something. Oh, you didn't have to go to the trouble of preparing the guest bedroom for me—I could have just slept on the couch!
See also: trouble

at the expense of someone or something

Fig. to the detriment of someone or something; to the harm of someone or something. He had a good laugh at the expense of his brother. He took a job in a better place at the expense of a larger income.
See also: expense, of

go to the expense (of doing something)

to pay the (large) cost of doing something. I hate to have to go to the expense of painting the house. It needs to be done, so you'll have to go to the expense.
See also: expense

go to the trouble (of doing something)

 and go to the trouble (to do something); go to the bother (of doing something); go to the bother (to do something)
to endure the effort or bother of doing something. I really don't want to go to the trouble to cook. Should I go to the bother of cooking something for her to eat? Don't go to the trouble. She can eat a sandwich.
See also: trouble

Money is no object,

 and Expense is no object.
Fig. It does not matter how much something costs. Please show me your finest automobile. Money is no object. I want the finest earrings you have. Don't worry about how much they cost because expense is no object.
See also: money, object

out-of-pocket expenses

Fig. the actual amount of money spent. (Alludes to the money one person pays while doing something on someone else's behalf. One is usually paid back this money.) My out-of-pocket expenses for the party were nearly $175. My employer usually reimburses all out-of-pocket expenses for a business trip.
See also: expense

at the expense of

Also, at one's expense.
1. Paid for by someone, as in The hotel bill for the sales force is at the expense of the company. [Mid-1600s]
2. To the detriment or injury of a person or thing, as in We can't speed up production at the expense of quality, or The laughter was all at Tom's expense. [Late 1600s]
See also: expense, of

go to the trouble

Also, take the trouble; go to the bother or the expense . Make the effort or spend the money for something. For example, He went to the trouble of calling every single participant, or She took the trouble to iron all the clothes, or Don't go to the bother of writing them, or They went to the expense of hiring a limousine. [Second half of 1800s] Also see put oneself out.
See also: trouble

money is no object

Also, expense is no object. It doesn't matter how much it costs, as in Get the very best fur coat you can find-money is no object. In this expression no object means "something not taken into account or presenting no obstacle." It was first recorded as salary will be no object in a 1782 newspaper advertisement for someone seeking a job. Both money and expense were so described by the mid-1800s.
See also: money, object

at someone's expense

COMMON If someone laughs or makes a joke at your expense, they laugh or make a joke about you. Danny told them about my accident and they all had a good laugh at my expense. There was plenty of laughter, most of it at my expense.
See also: expense

money is no object

COMMON If money is no object for someone, they are willing or able to spend as much money as necessary. The shop has a range of superb Swedish crystal glasses that I would have if money were no object.
See also: money, object

ˈdamn the consequences, expense, etc.

(spoken) used to say that you are going to do something even though you know it may be expensive, have bad results, etc: Let’s celebrate and damn the expense!
See also: damn

at somebody’s exˈpense


1 paid for by somebody: When Joe is travelling at the firm’s expense, he goes first class.
2 (of jokes, etc.) making somebody seem foolish: They all had a good laugh at Pete’s expense.
See also: expense

at the expense of somebody/something

causing damage or loss to somebody/something else: We could lower the price, but only at the expense of quality.

go to the expense of something/of doing something

,

go to a lot of, etc. exˈpense

spend money on something: They went to all the expense of redecorating the house and then they moved.
See also: expense, of, something

put somebody to the expense of something/of doing something

,

put somebody to a lot of, etc. exˈpense

make somebody spend money on something: Their visit put us to a lot of expense.

money, expense, etc. is no ˈobject

there is no need to worry about the amount of money, etc., because there is enough or because it has no importance: Choose whatever you like from the menu. It’s your birthday so money is no object.He was ready to travel anywhere. Distance was no object.
See also: object

spare no expense/pains/trouble (to do something/(in) doing something)

spend as much time, money or effort as is necessary: His twenty-first birthday party was amazing — his parents had spared no expense.The ship’s crew will spare no pains to make your Mediterranean cruise unforgettable.It will be a wonderful trip, no expense spared.

expense

n. a baby; a child. (see also deduction.) The little expense just cries, craps, and chows.

at (one's) expense

To one's detriment or chagrin: telling jokes at my expense.
See also: expense
References in periodicals archive ?
It also includes expense allowances for travel, transportation or other business expenses received under a nonaccountable plan and amounts paid to cover a cleric's self-employment or income taxes.
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15) Subsequent cases, however, use future benefits as the touchstone in determining whether an expense may be deducted.
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N submitted receipts for expenses to IMC and it issued checks to N from the corporate checking account when it had available funds--roughly one check per month, ranging from $500 to $4,000.
IRC section 162(a)(2) permits taxpayers a deduction for business travel expenses such as lodging, meals and other incidental costs while away from home.
An expenditure that does not meet the capital cost test is a current expense because it benefits the current, not future periods, and is to be included in operating expenses.
The purpose of these rules is to achieve a proper matching of income and expense in order to clearly reflect income.
under a reimbursement or other expense allowance arrangement with another person other than an employer;" see Regs.
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