expect

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Related to expects: detract from

be expecting

euphemism To be pregnant. I heard that you're expecting—congratulations! When is the baby due?
See also: expect

expect the unexpected

Be prepared to face unanticipated events or situations. Climbing a mountain has many dangers, so no matter how much you prepare, expect the unexpected.
See also: expect, unexpected

(just) as I expected

As I anticipated or suspected. The phrase is often said with a note of annoyance or frustration. My mother stole all the attention at my birthday party, just as I expected. As I expected, I didn't get the promotion. The boss just doesn't like me.
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blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed

Having high expectations often leads to disappointment when the desired result does not occur, so keeping expectations low will save one from being disappointed. I promised myself I wouldn't get my hopes up, so when I found out that my first-choice school had rejected me, I was actually OK with it. Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.

expect (someone or something) for (something)

To anticipate or expect someone or a group to attend something. Don't expect me for dinner because I have to work late tonight, unfortunately. I expected the team for practice at 5:30 and only two players are here—what is going on?
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expect (something) from (someone or something)

1. To anticipate or expect receiving something from someone or a group. I'm not sure what John's doing yet, but I expect a response from him soon. I expect attentiveness from my students—is that too much to ask?
2. To demand or request something from someone or a group. You're my senior advisor, Tom—I expect better judgment from you.
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be (only) to be expected

To be typical or unsurprising. Unfortunately, post-surgical pain is to be expected.
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What do you expect?

This is completely normal or expected; you shouldn't expect or hope for anything else. It's shame that we don't qualify, but what do you expect? The entire economy is skewed to favor major corporations over smaller companies like ours. What do you expect—he cheated once before, so it's no surprise he did it again.
See also: what

What can you expect?

This is completely normal or expected; you shouldn't expect or hope for anything else. It's shame that we don't qualify, but what can you expect? The entire economy is skewed to favor major corporations over smaller companies like ours. What can you expect—he cheated once before, so it's no surprise he did it again.
See also: can, what

Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.

Prov. If you do not expect good things to happen, you will not be disappointed when they fail to happen. Ellen: This is going to be the best vacation we've ever had; we're going to have fun every minute of every day. Fred: Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed. Jill: Do you think you'll win the contest? Jane: I like to keep in mind that blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.

expect someone or something for something

to anticipate someone or a group to attend something. I expect you for dinner on Thursday. We expected all of the board of directors for the meeting.
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expect something from someone or something

 
1. . to anticipate receiving something from someone or a group. I expect a letter from you at least once a week while you are gone. We expect at least a postcard out of you.
2. and expect something (out) of someone or something to demand something from someone or something. I expect more effort from you. Get to work.
3. and expect something (out) of someone or something to anticipate a certain kind of behavior from someone or something. We expected better from you. I'm very disappointed in your behavior. We really expected better behavior of you.
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expecting (a child)

to be pregnant. Tommy's mother is expecting a child. Oh, I didn't know she was expecting.
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Hope for the best and prepare for the worst,

 and Hope for the best but expect the worst.
Prov. You should have a positive attitude, but make sure you are ready for disaster. While my father was in the hospital after his heart attack, we hoped for the best and prepared for the worst. When you study for a major exam, hope for the best but expect the worst. Don't make yourself anxious worrying that it will be too difficult, but review as if you expect the exam to be extremely hard.
See also: and, hope, prepare, worst

I guess

 and I expect; I suppose; I suspect 
1. a phrase that introduces a supposition. (Frequently, in speech, suppose is reduced to 'spose, and expect and suspect are reduced to 'spect. The apostrophe is not always shown.) Bob: I guess it's going to rain. Bill: Oh, I don't know. Maybe so, maybe not. Alice: I expect you'll be wanting to leave pretty soon. John: Why? It's early yet.
2. a vague way of answering 'yes'. John: You want some more coffee? Jane: I 'spose. Alice: Ready to go? John: I spect.
See also: guess

I guess not.

 and (I) don't think so.; I expect not.; I suppose not.; I suspect not.; I think not.
a vague statement of negation. (More polite or gentle than simply saying no. Frequently, in speech, suppose is reduced to 'spose, and expect and suspect are reduced to 'spect. The apostrophe is not always shown.) Bill: It's almost too late to go to the movie. Shall we try anyway? Mary: I guess not. Tom: Will it rain? Mary: I 'spect not.
See also: guess, not

I guess (so).

 and I believe so.; I expect (so).; I suppose (so).; I suspect (so).; I think so.
a vague expression of assent. (Frequently, in speech, suppose is reduced to 'spose, and expect and suspect are reduced to 'spect. The apostrophe is not always shown.) Tom: Will it rain today? Bob: I suppose so. Sue: Happy? Bill: I 'spect. Sue: You don't sound happy. Bill: I guess not.
See also: guess

(just) as I expected

I thought so; I knew it would be this way. Just as I expected. The window was left open and it rained in. As I expected, he left work early again.
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when least expected

when one does not expect something. An old car is likely to give you trouble when least expected. My pencil usually breaks when least expected.
See also: expect, least

You can't expect me to believe that.

 and You don't expect me to believe that.
That is so outrageous that no one could believe it. Bill: My father is running for president. Bob: You can't expect me to believe that. Jane: Everyone in our family has one extra toe. Mary: You don't expect me to believe that!
See also: believe, expect, that

when least expected

When something is not awaited, as in My brother always calls when least expected, or You might know that the furnace would break down when least expected-we just had it overhauled .
See also: expect, least

what can (or do) you expect?

used to emphasize that there was nothing unexpected about a person or event.
A more elaborate statement of the same sentiment is the proverb what can you expect from a pig but a grunt ?
See also: can, what

what (else) do you exˈpect?

(spoken) used to tell somebody not to be surprised by something: She shouted at you? What do you expect when you treat her like that?
See also: what

be (only) to be exˈpected

be likely to happen; be quite normal: A little tiredness after taking these drugs is to be expected.‘I’m afraid I’m very nervous.’ ‘Don’t worry, that’s only to be expected.’
See also: expect

be exˈpecting

(informal) be pregnant: I hear Sue’s expecting.
See also: expect
References in periodicals archive ?
We expect to be quite heavily involved with the landing and recovery of the new space vehicle,'' Petersen said.
Slightly over half the panelists expect a change in the Fed's communication style under new Chairman Ben Bernanke, with most expecting a continued trend towards transparency and some also anticipating more clarity from Fed statements.
TMAC expects this market to recover slightly in 1999, to 57.
And perhaps most interesting of all, what do their capital spending plans reveal about where they expect automotive plastics to go in terms of materials and processing types?
In fiscal 2008, the company expects to open approximately 90 new U.
government import figures through May 1998, the RMA expects 1998 passenger tire imports to reach 53 million, an increase of more than 10% from last years' imports of 47.
But they were less sure that the proportion of machines over 10 years old will decrease; and a majority expects no change in the proportion five to 10 years old.
TMAC expects moderate growth for these markets in 1998, just topping five million.
The Company expects to report that revenue for the fourth quarter of 2006 increased approximately 20% to $56.
Pioneer expects to invest approximately $225 million (Pioneer's 45% interest) in the South Coast Gas project, with approximately 50% having been spent in 2006 and the remainder expected to be spent in 2007.
While the committee recognized the probability of peaks and valleys in tire demand over the next five years, their forecast focused on the annualized average growth that various industry segments can look to expect.
With the pursuit of new market segments combined with unseasonably higher media rates, we expect to see moderately higher customer acquisition costs in first quarter 2007 on a year-over-year basis.
The Partnership expects cash capital expenditures during the quarter to be approximately $15 million consisting of $13 million for growth projects, largely the Tyler County Pipeline and Red Deer projects, and $2 million for maintenance capital including routine well connects.
Over the next two to three years, the Company expects to test a number of opportunities and to continue technical work that is currently underway.
In Spite of the Fourth-Quarter Slowdown, Gibraltar Expects to Report Record Sales and Earnings from Continuing Operations in 2006