expect from

expect something from someone or something

 
1. . to anticipate receiving something from someone or a group. I expect a letter from you at least once a week while you are gone. We expect at least a postcard out of you.
2. and expect something (out) of someone or something to demand something from someone or something. I expect more effort from you. Get to work.
3. and expect something (out) of someone or something to anticipate a certain kind of behavior from someone or something. We expected better from you. I'm very disappointed in your behavior. We really expected better behavior of you.
See also: expect
References in classic literature ?
As an animal, Edward excelled me far; should he prove as paramount in mind as in person I must be a slave--for I must expect from him no lion-like generosity to one weaker than himself; his cold, avaricious eye, his stern, forbidding manner told me he would not spare.
Tyrrel, most unwisely and improperly, sent for Norah, and, repeating the conversation that had taken place, warned her of the reception she might expect from the man who stood toward you in the position of a father, if she accepted an offer of marriage on your part.
The worst that a prince may expect from a hostile people is to be abandoned by them; but from hostile nobles he has not only to fear abandonment, but also that they will rise against him; for they, being in these affairs more far- seeing and astute, always come forward in time to save themselves, and to obtain favours from him whom they expect to prevail.
But to make of it a reproach is what I did not expect from you.
An anatomist--even a mere physiognomist-- would have seen that the deformity of Philip's spine was not a congenital hump, but the result of an accident in infancy; but you do not expect from Tom any acquaintance with such distinctions; to him, Philip was simply a humpback.