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bad excuse is better than none

Prov. If you offer some explanation for an unwanted action, there is a slight chance that it will be accepted and you will therefore not be in trouble, but if you have no explanation at all, you do not even have that slight chance. Fred: I can't believe we played cards till midnight! What will I tell my wife when she asks why I'm so late getting home? Bill: Tell her something came up at the office. Fred: But that's a lousy excuse. She'll never believe it. Bill: A bad excuse is better than none.
See also: bad, better, excuse, none

Could I be excused?

Would you give me permission to leave?; Would you give me permission to leave the table? (Also used with can or may in place of could.) Bill: I'm finished, Mom. Could I be excused? Mother: Yes, of course, when you use good manners like that.
See also: could

Could you excuse us, please?

 and Can you excuse us, please?; Would you excuse us, please?; Will you excuse us, please?
We must leave. I hope you will forgive us. (A polite way of announcing a departure.) Bill: Could you excuse us, please? We simply must rush off. Alice: So sorry you have to go. Come back when you can stay longer.
See also: could, excuse

Excuse me.

 and Excuse, please.; Pardon (me).; 'Scusc (me).; 'Scusc, please. 
1. an expression asking forgiveness for some minor social violation, such as belching or bumping into someone. ('Scuse is colloquial, and the apostrophe is not always used.) John: Ouch! Bob: Excuse me. I didn't see you there. Mary: Oh! Ow! Sue: Pardon me. I didn't mean to bump into you. Tom: Ouch! Mary: Oh, dear! What happened? Tom: You stepped on my toe. Mary: Excuse me. I'm sorry.
2. Please let me through.; Please let me by. Tom: Excuse me. I need to get past. Bob: Oh, sorry. I didn't know I was in the way. Mary: Pardon me. Sue: What? Mary: Pardon me. I want to get past you.
See also: excuse

excuse someone

1. . to forgive someone. (Usually with me. Said when interrupting or when some other minor offense has been committed. There are many mannerly uses of this expression.) John came in late and said, "Excuse me, please." John said "excuse me" when he interrupted our conversation. When John made a strange noise at the table, he said quietly, "Excuse me." John suddenly left the room saying, "Excuse me. I'll be right back."
2. to permit someone to leave; to permit someone to remain away from an event. The coach excused John from practice yesterday. The teacher excused John, and he ran quickly from the room.

excuse someone for something

to pardon someone for something or for (doing) something. Please excuse me for this mess. I've not been able to clean the house. I can't excuse myself for not doing it.
See also: excuse

excuse someone from something

to permit a person not to do something; to exempt someone from something. Please excuse me from attending the meeting. I must excuse myself from the discussion.
See also: excuse

He who excuses himself accuses himself.

Prov. By apologizing for something, you admit that you did it. Maybe I should tell my boss I'm sorry for breaking the copy machine. On the other hand, he who excuses himself accuses himself.
See also: accuse, excuse, he, himself, who

Ignorance (of the law) is no excuse (for breaking it).

Prov. Even if you do not know that something is against the law, you can still be punished for doing it. (An ancient legal principle.) Police officer: I'm giving you a speeding ticket. Motorist: But I didn't know I was exceeding the speed limit! Police officer: Ignorance of the law is no excuse for breaking it. Terry protested that he didn't know it was illegal to break the windows of an abandoned building, but the judge informed him that ignorance of the law was no excuse.
See also: excuse, ignorance

May I be excused?

May I leave this place, please?; May I leave to use the toilet? Nature calls. May I be excused? The student raised her hand and said, "Teacher, may I be excused?"
See also: may

Pardon my French,

 and Excuse my French.
Inf. Excuse my use of swear words or taboo words. (Does not refer to real French.) Pardon my French, but this is a hell of a day. What she needs is a kick in the ass, if you'll excuse my French.
See also: french, pardon

use someone or something as an excuse

to blame someone or something (for a failure). (See also use someone or something as something.) John used his old car as an excuse for not going to the meeting. My husband was sick in bed, and I used him as an excuse.
See also: excuse, use

Would you excuse me?

1. a polite question that essentially announces one's departure. (Compare this with Could I be excused?; Excuse me.) Jane: Would you excuse me? I have to get home now. Andy: Oh, sure. I'll see you to the door. Rising to leave, Jane said, "Would you excuse me?" and left by the rear door.
2. . a polite way to request passage through or by a group of people; a way to request space to exit an elevator. There were two people talking in the corridor, blocking it. Tom said, "Would you excuse me?" They stepped aside. Fred: Would you excuse me? This is my floor. Sally: Sure. It's mine, too.
See also: excuse

You're excused.

1. You may leave the room, the table, etc. (Said in response to May I be excused?) Mother: Are you finished, Tom? Tom: Yes, ma'am. Mother: You're excused. Bill (raising his hand): Can I leave the room? I have to go get my books off my bike. Teacher: You're excused. Bill: Thanks.
2. You must leave the room or the premises. (Typically said at the end of a scolding.) Father: I've heard quite enough of this nonsense, Tom. You're excused. Tom: Sorry. Andy: That is the end of this conversation. You're excused. Bob: But, there's more.
3. You are forgiven for belching or for some other breach of strict etiquette. (Said in response to Excuse me.) Tom (after belching): Excuse me. Father: You're excused. Sally: Excuse me for being so noisy. Mother: You're excused.
See also: excuse

excuse me

1. I am sorry to interrupt you Oh, excuse me, I didn't know you were busy.
2. that was not what I intended to say or do As a kid growing up, my family grew strawberries, excuse me, grew tomatoes.
3. I did not hear you Which office do you work in? Excuse me?
Related vocabulary: pardon me
See also: excuse

excuse me

1. Also, I beg your pardon, pardon me. Forgive me, as in Excuse me, please let me pass, or Pardon me for asking, or I beg your pardon, I don't think so. These phrases are used as an apology for interrupting a conversation, bumping into someone, asking a speaker to repeat something, politely disagreeing with something said, and so on. The first dates from about 1600, the first variant from about 1800, the second from the mid-1700s.
2. Also, excuse oneself. Allow or ask to leave or be released from an obligation. For example, Please excuse me, I have to leave now, or I asked the judge to excuse me from jury duty. [1920s]
See also: excuse

Pardon my French

and Excuse my French
sent. Excuse my use of swear words or taboo words.; Excuse my choice of vocabulary. (Does not refer to real French.) What she needs is a kick in the butt, if you’ll excuse my French.
See also: french, pardon

Excuse my French

See also: excuse, french

(Well,) pardon me for living!

and Excuse me for breathing! and Excuse me for living!
tv. I am SOOO sorry! (A very sarcastic response to a rebuke, seeming to regret the apparent offense of even living.) A: You are blocking my view. Please move. B: Well, pardon me for living! You say you were here first? Well excuse me for breathing!
See also: pardon

Excuse me for breathing!

See also: excuse

Excuse me for living!

See also: excuse

Excuse me

1. Used to acknowledge and ask forgiveness for an action that could cause offense.
2. Used to request that a statement be repeated.
See also: excuse

pardon my French

Please excuse my language. In the days when language propriety was more of an issue than it is now, using a word or phrase that was “unfit for mixed company” was likely to lead to embarrassment. Since French was considered a racy language, people excused themselves with “pardon my French.”
See also: french, pardon
References in periodicals archive ?
Excuser le defendeur de sa conduite, c'est, en effet, admettre que, malgre les raisons valables qu'il y aurait d'operer compensation, le defendeur n'a pas a indemniser le demandeur dans les circonstances de l'espece.
De toutes les manieres, il faut aussi excuser les agents d'autorites insensibles a la chose culturelle et intellectuelle.
Je suis toujours peine d'entendre des extremistes d'un camp justifier le massacre de refugies hutus du Zaire par le genocide de 1994, et ceux de l'autre camp vouloir excuser leur forfait par ce qu'ils appellent la vengeance tutsie de 1997.
L'air du temps et le stress quotidien ne peuvent occulter, et encore moins, excuser le devoir de memoire envers ceux qui nous ont inculque les valeurs d'humanisme revolutionnaire, la culture du desinteressement et la foi de defendre la patrie et les masses demunies.
It's time for a consortium of world leaders - including his excusers in Beijing - to deal with this sicko, and with a few others nearly as bad in Africa and the Middle East.
But many commentators fear these controversial claims play into the hands of Hitler excusers and neo-Nazis suggesting he was of unsound mind, and could be held only partly responsible for the millions of deaths he ordered?
With Team GB's blinding medal count we no longer see ourselves as a nation of moaners and excusers, we are suddenly a nation of winners and no one is more inspired by this national mood shift than our kids.
One of the ways Obama excusers are deflecting attention from the re-revelations last week of his cut-and-paste campaign is by insisting Hillary Clinton has also stolen a few of his lines.
You gave Jack Strayer the front page to spew his "know-nothing" nonsense about global warming despite Katrina, melting icebergs, increases in water and air temperatures, and the egregious corporate polluters and governmental excusers.
Will the excusers for the offenders champion the cause of the victim?
Excusers express their opinions in undated New York Post and New York Morning Telegraph clippings in The Life of Emile Zola Papers, WB Archives; see also Variety review, 30 June 1937, which argued that the film's "[r]acial theme is lightly touched upon, but impressive notwithstanding.