everybody


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a good word for everybody

A friendly, amiable, and positive regard for one and all. He was my favorite professor, always a smile on his face and a good word for everybody.
See also: everybody, good, word

a kind word for everybody

A friendly, amiable, and positive regard for one and all. I believe that if I can have a kind word for everybody, I will end up making other people's lives that much better.
See also: everybody, kind, word

everyone and their brother

A large number or a majority of people. Used hyperbolically. Everyone and their brother is going to be at the wedding this July, I hope I can make it too.
See also: and, brother, everyone

burst the bubble of (someone)

To upset or destroy someone's belief, conviction, or mood by delivering news that runs contrary to what he or she holds to be true. I hate to burst the bubble of everyone here, but this period of economic success will not last long.
See also: bubble, burst, of

bust (one's) chops

1. (acting upon oneself) To exert a significant amount of energy or work very hard to do, accomplish, or complete something. I've been busting my chops all night long to get this presentation ready for tomorrow's meeting. She's going to have to bust her chops if she wants a place on the varsity team.
2. (acting upon someone else) To harass, nag, or upbraid someone to do, accomplish, or complete something. The boss is busting everyone's chops to get the project ready by next week. Quit busting my chops! I'll get it done eventually!
See also: bust, chops

bust (one's) balls

1. vulgar (acting upon oneself) To exert a significant amount of energy to do, accomplish, or complete something, especially with great haste. I've been busting my balls all night long to get this presentation ready for tomorrow's meeting. She's going to have to bust her balls if she wants a place on the varsity team.
2. vulgar (acting upon someone else) To harass, nag, or upbraid someone to do, accomplish, or complete something. The boss is busting everyone's balls to get the project ready by next week. Quit busting my balls! I'll get it done eventually!
3. vulgar (acting upon someone else) To tease, ridicule, or mock someone, usually jocosely. Don't get so worked up, man, I'm just busting your balls. I like her family, but her uncle always busts my balls when we see him.
See also: ball, bust

bust (one's) hump

1. (acting upon oneself) To exert a significant amount of energy to do, accomplish, or complete something, especially with great haste. I've been busting my hump all night long to get this presentation ready for tomorrow's meeting. She's going to have to bust her hump if she wants a place on the varsity team.
2. (acting upon someone else) To harass, nag, or upbraid someone to do, accomplish, or complete something. The boss is busting everyone's hump to get the project ready by next week. Quit busting my hump! I'll get it done eventually!
See also: bust, hump

everybody and his cousin

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and his cousin is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, cousin, everybody

everybody and his dog

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and his dog is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, dog, everybody

everybody and his mother

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and his mother is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, everybody, mother

everybody and their mother

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and their mother is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, everybody, mother

everybody and his mum

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. Primarily heard in UK. I'm so jealous, everybody and his mum is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, everybody, mum

everybody and their mum

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. Primarily heard in UK. I'm so jealous, everybody and their mum is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, everybody, mum

everybody and his uncle

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and his uncle is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, everybody, uncle

everybody and their brother

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and their brother is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, brother, everybody

everybody and their dog

Used hyperbolically to express a large number or a majority of people. I'm so jealous, everybody and their dog is going on a vacation this summer except for me.
See also: and, dog, everybody

puts (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)

A saying emphasizing that someone is just an ordinary human being. (Used especially in reference to someone who is of an elevated social status, such as a celebrity, star athlete, member of royalty, etc. Variations of "everybody else" are also often used, such as "the rest of us," "you and me," "ordinary people," and so on.) Primarily heard in UK. Because our only interaction with celebrities is through the media, it's easy to forget that they put their trousers on one leg at a time, just like everybody else. The superstar comedian's latest non-fiction book provides a quirky insight into her day-to-day life, and reminds you that she puts her trousers on one leg at a time just like the rest of us. I might be the youngest billionaire in the world, but I still put my trousers on one leg at a time!
See also: everybody, leg, like, on, one, put, time, trouser

put (one's) pants on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)

To be an ordinary human being; to go through life like everyone else. (Used especially in reference to someone who is of an elevated social status, such as a celebrity, star athlete, member of royalty, etc. Variations of "everybody else" are also often used, such as "the rest of us," "you and me," "ordinary people," and so on.) Primarily heard in Australia. Because our only interaction with celebrities is through the media, it's easy to forget that they are just human beings who put their pants on one leg at a time. The superstar comedian's latest non-fiction book gives you a quirky insight into her day-to-day life, and reminds you that she puts her pants on one leg at a time just like the rest of us. Even though I made my millions at a young age, I was determined that I would still put my pants on one leg at a time just like everybody else.
See also: everybody, leg, like, on, one, pant, put, time

put (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)

To be an ordinary human being; to go through life like everyone else. (Used especially in reference to someone who is of an elevated social status, such as a celebrity, star athlete, member of royalty, etc. Variations of "everybody else" are also often used, such as "the rest of us," "you and me," "ordinary people," and so on.) Primarily heard in UK. Because our only interaction with celebrities is through the media, it's easy to forget that they are just human beings who put their trousers on one leg at a time. The superstar comedian's latest non-fiction book gives you a quirky insight into her day-to-day life, and reminds you that she puts her trousers on one leg at a time just like the rest of us. Even though I made my millions at a young age, I was determined that I would still put my trousers on one leg at a time just like everybody else.
See also: everybody, leg, like, on, one, put, time, trouser

(one) puts (one's) pants on one leg at a time

Someone being spoken of or referred to is just an ordinary human being. Used especially in reference to someone who is of an elevated social status, such as a celebrity, star athlete, member of royalty, etc. The phrase is often followed by "just like everybody else." Primarily heard in US. Because our only interaction with celebrities is through the media, it's easy to forget that they put their pants on one leg at a time, just like everybody else. The superstar comedian's latest non-fiction book provides a quirky insight into her day-to-day life, and reminds you that she puts her pants on one leg at a time just like the rest of us. I might be the youngest billionaire in the world, but I still put my pants on one leg at a time!
See also: leg, on, one, pant, put, time

everybody and his brother

 and everybody and his uncle
Fig. everybody; lots of people. The state fair was packed. Everybody and his brother was there. Everybody and his uncle was asking me where you was today.
See also: and, brother, everybody

Everybody loves a lord.

Prov. People are attracted to the wealthy and powerful. Although the prince was vulgar and unpleasant, he always received plenty of invitations to social gatherings; everybody loves a lord.
See also: everybody, lord, love
References in classic literature ?
He said old Jeff Hooker would tell everybody, and we'd never hear the last of it.
There is poetry here and fantasy and humor, a little pathos but, above all, a number of creations in whose existence everybody must believe whether they be children of four or old men of ninety or prosperous bankers of forty-five.
If your answer is no, everybody will be dead AND BURIED
Everybody had remarked that something had passed between the king and queen; but both of them had spoken so low that everybody, out of respect, withdrew several steps, so that nobody had heard anything.
She felt that she had a friend, and the kindness of her cousin Edmund gave her better spirits with everybody else.
Half an hour's indulgence in these considerations works you up into a state of savage fury against everybody and everything, especially yourself, whom anatomical reasons alone prevent your kicking.
I want everybody to know--I want you to let me announce it this evening at the ball.
I know you never do, my dear; and you will always find your reward in the affection it makes everybody feel for you.
For the next three days everybody went about saying, "White rose, Red rose, Red rose, White rose"; and the King gave orders that the Page's salary was to be doubled.
Everybody was busy and everybody was 'appy and everybody got a good square meal every day.
When everybody rose to go, Helene who had spoken very little all the evening again turned to Boris, asking him in a tone of caressing significant command to come to her on Tuesday.
They were all together (except Eureka) in the pretty rooms of the Princess, and the Wizard did some new tricks, and the Scarecrow told stories, and the Tin Woodman sang a love song in a sonorous, metallic voice, and everybody laughed and had a good time.
Everybody was up early, for the travellers must leave in time to catch the nine o'clock train.
Miss Ledrook eked out this speech with so many mysterious nods and frowns before she shut the door again, that a profound silence came upon all the company, during which Miss Snevellicci's papa looked very big indeed--several sizes larger than life--at everybody in turn, but particularly at Nicholas, and kept on perpetually emptying his tumbler and filling it again, until the ladies returned in a cluster, with Miss Snevellicci among them.
So now he got the place of "Universal Bellringer," and wrote yearly a short treatise "On the Owl"; but everybody was just as wise as before.