every Tom, Dick, and Harry

every Tom, Dick, and Harry

anyone Draw the curtains or we'll have every Tom, Dick, and Harry peeking in the window.
Usage notes: usually said about any person you do not know or think is unimportant, and sometimes used in the form any Tom, Dick, or Harry: I want a qualified plumber to do the job, not just any Tom, Dick, or Harry.
See also: and, every, harry

every Tom, Dick, and Harry

Also, every mother's son; every man Jack. Everyone, all ordinary individuals, as in This model should appeal to every Tom, Dick, and Harry. The use of masculine names in this way dates from Shakespeare's time (he used Tom, Dick, and Francis in 1 Henry IV), but the current one dates from the early 1800s. The two variants are largely British usage but occasionally are used in America. The first is recorded as early as 1583, whereas the second dates from the first half of the 1800s.
See also: and, every, harry
References in periodicals archive ?
The typical American Protestant approach is to make every Tom, Dick, and Harry Saint Tom, Saint Dick, and Saint Harry through the act of baptism.
Don't try to keep up with every Tom, Dick, and Harry if you can't afford it," says Theresa.