erotic dancer

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erotic dancer

n. a dancer, typically female, who performs teasing and sexually stimulating dances, usually on a stage. She was a school teacher by day and an erotic dancer by night.
See also: dancer
References in periodicals archive ?
SenSexual: A Unique Anthology 2013 offers readers a glimpse into the monthly, standing-room-only, Erotic Literary Salon in Philadelphia.
I was doing some market research and couldn't find erotic books for women and couples to read," she explains.
Erotics is about sensitivity, and the Balkan sensitivity is unique, that is why this encyclopedia is so captivating," according to its author.
However, as Kothari puts it, " No matter how old or new an art object is, the erotic has always found an expression.
Sue Niebrzydowski's "'So wel koude he me glose': The Wife of Bath and the Eroticism of Touch" considers the intersection of textual and erotic pleasures in regard to Chaucer's lusty wife and the textual/sexual pleasures of glossing.
When the erotic reduction stops, most frequently with orgasm, we are suddenly catapulted back into the world of objects.
There are three central elements that define erotic self-portraiture as a generic category.
As a book intended to introduce students and scholars to ways of reading erotic imagery in literature, Reading Sex in the Eighteenth Century has much to recommend it.
I thought I already knew and loved this work, but here its evocation of bodies lost was knee-weakening, for, true to its thesis, the exhibition carefully cultivates an awareness of the erotic, touch-me charge of the sculptures it showcases.
Thomas (4) ($13, Downtown Press, ISBN 0-743-47728-6) Another erotic journey from the author of Threesome and Fourplay.
Quixotic Erotic by Tamai Kobayashi (Arsenal Pulp Press 2003)
And it dawned on me that I too was depriving Kim of erotic treats that she had once cherished.
What may be particularly interesting to readers of this journal is what the ancient Christian "counter-erotics" tells us about God, who defies discursive delimitation yet remains the measure "of such a sublime erotic ambition" (15).
Is it not even more arresting that two of the films (from a country that is lucky to see two or three going international any given year anyway) are about the erotic allure of death, the need for the living to possess and be possessed by death in the most literal manner next to actually checking out oneself?