equal


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Related to equal: equal sets

all else being equal

When external circumstances or factors do not or will not affect the outcome or decision of something at hand. All else being equal, I don't see our relationship continuing for much longer.
See also: all, being, else, equal

equal to the occasion

Having the necessary ability, talent, qualities, or capability to handle or accomplish a given role or situation. The young soldier proved equal to the occasion and saved his platoon from an enemy ambush. We need a manager who can lead project initiatives and efficiently direct employees—do you think you're equal to the occasion?
See also: equal, occasion

equal to the task

Having the necessary ability, talent, qualities, or capability to handle or accomplish a given role or situation. The young soldier proved equal to the task and saved his platoon from an enemy ambush. We need a manager who can lead project initiatives and efficiently direct employees—do you think you're equal to the task?
See also: equal, task

all things being equal

In the event that all aspects of a situation remain the same. Now, I know there are a lot of risks involved, but, all things being equal, I think we should still move ahead with the deal. Alexis is really nervous about committing to a mortgage, but, all things being equal, it will prove to be a great investment.
See also: all, being, equal, thing

be first among equals

To be more important or renowned than one's peers. Riley is the best choice for that difficult project—she's first among equals.
See also: among, equal, first

equal in (someone or something)

To be the same as someone or something in some way. A noun or pronoun can be used between "equal" and "in." The twins may be equal in stature, but Erin has a much bigger personality than Caitlin. My idea equals anyone else's in merit, and I am determined to present it to the mayor herself.
See also: equal

equal to (someone or something)

1. As skilled or accomplished as someone else. I don't understand why I didn't get the promotion when I am certainly equal to Greg in every way.
2. Having the necessary ability, talent, qualities, or capability to handle or accomplish a given role or situation. The young soldier proved equal to the task and saved his platoon from an enemy ambush.
See also: equal

first among equals

More important or renowned than one's peers. Riley is the best choice for that difficult project—she's first among equals.
See also: among, equal, first

other things being equal

In the event that all aspects of a situation remain the same. Now, I know there are a lot of risks involved, but, other things being equal, I think we should still move ahead with the deal. Alexis is really nervous about committing to a mortgage, but, other things being equal, it will prove to be a great investment.
See also: being, equal, other, thing

equal someone or something in something

to be even or identical with someone or something in something. John equals Bill in strength and size, I think. This cake equals that one in texture but not in richness.
See also: equal

equal to

someone as good or as accomplished as someone else. I certainly feel equal to Randy. He's nothing special. I don't think that Bill feels equal to Bob, even though they are twins.
See also: equal

equal to

(someone or something) able to handle or deal with someone or something. I'm afraid that I'm not equal to Mrs. Smith's problem right now. Please ask her to come back later. That's a very difficult task, but I'm sure Bill is equal to it.
See also: equal

other things being equal

 and all things being equal
Cliché if things stay the way they are now; if there are no complications from other factors. Other things being equal, we should have no trouble getting your order to you on time. I anticipate no problems, all things being equal.
See also: being, equal, other, thing

separate but equal

segregated but of equal value or quality. (A doctrine once sanctioned by the U.S. Supreme Court regarding racial segregation.) The separate but equal doctrine was abandoned years ago. They were provided with facilities that were said to be separate but equalbut were really of a lower standard.
See also: but, equal, separate

equal to

Adequate or fit in ability or extent, as in I'm not sure I'm equal to the task. [Late 1600s] Also see feel up to; up to.
See also: equal

other things being equal

Also, all else being equal. Given the same circumstances, as in Other things being equal, I prefer the green sofa. This term is a translation of the Latin phrase ceteris paribus, which was widely used until the 18th century, when it began to be replaced by the English equivalent.
See also: being, equal, other, thing

separate but equal

Relating to or affected by a policy whereby two groups may be segregated if they are given equal facilities and opportunities. For example, They've divided up the physical education budget so that the girls' teams are separate but equal to the boys . This idiom comes from a Louisiana law of 1890, upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in Plessy v. Ferguson, "requiring all railway companies carrying passengers on their trains in this state, to provide equal but separate accommodations for the white and colored races." Subsequently it was widely used to separate African-Americans from the white population through a general policy of racial segregation. In 1954, in a unanimous ruling to end school segregation, the Supreme Court finally overturned the law (in Brown v. Board of Education).
See also: but, equal, separate

first among equals

the person or thing having the highest status in a group.
This expression is a translation of the Latin phrase primus inter pares , which is also used in English.
See also: among, equal, first

other (or all) things being equal

provided that other factors or circumstances remain the same.
1996 E. D. Hirsch Jr. Schools We Need Other things being equal, students from good-home schools will always have an educational advantage over students from less-good-home schools.
See also: being, equal, other, thing

be without ˈequal

,

have no ˈequal

(formal) be better than anything else or anyone else of the same type: He was a violinist without equal.
See also: equal, without

on equal ˈterms (with somebody/something)

,

on the same ˈterms (as somebody/something)

with no difference or advantage over another person; as equals: We’re not competing on equal terms; the other team has one more player.A good teacher should treat all her students on the same terms.
See also: equal, on, term

ˌsome (people, members, etc.) are more equal than ˈothers

(saying) although the members of a society, group, etc. appear to be equal, some get better treatment than othersThis phrase is used by one of the pigs in the book Animal Farm by George Orwell: ‘All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others.’
See also: equal, more, other

ˌfirst among ˈequals

the person or thing with the highest status in a group: Our history classes were usually open discussion-groups between us and our teacher, with the teacher as first among equals.
See also: among, equal, first

in some, equal, etc. ˈmeasure

(formal) to some, etc. extent or degree: The introduction of a new tax accounted in some measure for the downfall of the government.Our thanks are due in equal measure to every member of the team.
See also: measure

other/all things being ˈequal

if nothing else changes; if other conditions remain the same: Other things being equal, prices will rise if people’s incomes rise.
See also: all, being, equal, other, thing
References in classic literature ?
That we do, as an apology to others and to ourselves for not reaching the mark of a good and equal life.
SOCRATES: And a third, which is equal to either of them?
SOCRATES: And are there not here four equal lines which contain this space?
2] The myriameter is equal to rather more than 10,936 cubic yards English.
Because we are floating in space, my dear captain, and in space bodies fall or move (which is the same thing) with equal speed whatever be their weight or form; it is the air, which by its resistance creates these differences in weight.
If a number of equal spheres be described with their centres placed in two parallel layers; with the centre of each sphere at the distance of radius x sqrt(2) or radius x 1.
We must suppose the Melipona to make her cells truly spherical, and of equal sizes; and this would not be very surprising, seeing that she already does so to a certain extent, and seeing what perfectly cylindrical burrows in wood many insects can make, apparently by turning round on a fixed point.
From the experiment of the ridge of vermilion wax, we can clearly see that if the bees were to build for themselves a thin wall of wax, they could make their cells of the proper shape, by standing at the proper distance from each other, by excavating at the same rate, and by endeavouring to make equal spherical hollows, but never allowing the spheres to break into each other.
The work of construction seems to be a sort of balance struck between many bees, all instinctively standing at the same relative distance from each other, all trying to sweep equal spheres, and then building up, or leaving ungnawed, the planes of intersection between these spheres.
Thus, as I believe, the most wonderful of all known instincts, that of the hive-bee, can be explained by natural selection having taken advantage of numerous, successive, slight modifications of simpler instincts; natural selection having by slow degrees, more and more perfectly, led the bees to sweep equal spheres at a given distance from each other in a double layer, and to build up and excavate the wax along the planes of intersection.
He was equable and not cringing with his superiors, was free and ingratiating in his behavior with his equals, and was contemptuously indulgent with his inferiors.
To my weak judgment it hath ever seemed that his gifts are not equal to his wishes.
Why have we not the wings of the pigeon, the eyes of the eagle, and the legs of the moose, if it had been intended that man should be equal to all his wishes?
Suppose that a [less than or equal to] b, then aa[degrees] [less than or equal to] bb[degrees] and a[degrees]a [less than or equal to] b[degrees]b by definition 1.
Y, if and only if ([for all] x [member of] X)([for all] y [member of] Y)(x [not equal to] y).