emotion


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burst with (an emotion)

Of an emotion, to be so filled up with something as to be unable to contain it. I was bursting with anger after they fired me from my job. My kids burst with joy when we told them we were going to the theme park over the weekend.
See also: burst

choked with emotion

So overwhelmed with an emotion, either positive or negative, as to be unable to speak clearly or at all. I was positively choked with emotion by all the lovely speeches at my retirement party.
See also: choke, emotion

choked by emotion

So overwhelmed with an emotion, either positive or negative, as to be unable to speak clearly or at all. She was choked by emotion when she stepped up to speak at her mother's funeral.
See also: choke, emotion

mixed emotions

Positive and negative emotions that are experienced simultaneously and are often in conflict with one another. I've got mixed emotions about starting college this fall: on the one hand, I can't wait to start the next chapter in my education, but, on the other, I will be so sad leaving my friends and family behind.
See also: emotion, mixed

let one's emotions show

to be emotional, especially where it is not appropriate. I'm sorry for the outburst. I didn't mean to let my emotions show. Please stop crying. You mustn't let your emotions show.
See also: emotion, let, show
References in classic literature ?
of each literary work as a product of Fine Art, appealing with peculiar power both to our minds and to our emotions, not least to the sense of Beauty and the whole higher nature.
Sherrington, by experiments on dogs, showed that many of the usual marks of emotion were present in their behaviour even when, by severing the spinal cord in the lower cervical region, the viscera were cut off from all communication with the brain, except that existing through certain cranial nerves.
Angell suggests that the display of emotion in such cases may be due to past experience, generating habits which would require only the stimulation of cerebral reflex arcs.
If it were necessary for me to take sides on this question, I should agree with this conclusion; but I think my thesis as to the analysis of emotion can be maintained without coming to.
According to our definitions, if James is right, an emotion may be regarded as involving a confused perception of the viscera concerned in its causation, while if Cannon and Sherrington are right, an emotion involves a confused perception of its external stimulus.
An emotion in its entirety is, of course, something much more complex than a perception.
This is a subject upon which much valuable and exceedingly interesting work has been done, whereas the bare analysis of emotions has proved somewhat barren.
Modern views on the causation of emotions begin with what is called the James-Lange theory.
These are among the ductless glands, the functions of which, both in physiology and in connection with the emotions, have only come to be known during recent years.
Cannon's work is not unconnected with that of Mosso, who maintains, as the result of much experimental work, that "the seat of the emotions lies in the sympathetic nervous system.
Various different emotions make us cry, and therefore it cannot be true to say, as James does, that we "feel sorry because we cry," since sometimes we cry when we feel glad.
Because of his inclusion of the basis of an emotion, Tsongkhapa's analysis uncovers more causes and conditions for emotional experiences than just the object of the emotion (which is the cause that contemporary Western philosophers of emotion tend to focus on).
Supported emotions arise from the customer experience of the product, while associated emotion is suggested by advertising.
notes that for a philosophical account of the emotions to be persuasive, it must be intellectually vigorous and illuminate our ordinary and personal experiences.
As a consequence of Descartes' insistence that knowledge be certain, fallible emotion has been seen as at best irrelevant to post-enlightenment epistemology, at worst an obstacle.