embalming fluid


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embalming fluid

n. strong liquor; raw whiskey. Bartender, pour out this embalming fluid and get me your best.
See also: embalm
References in periodicals archive ?
An improved low-formaldehyde embalming fluid to preserve cadavers for anatomy teaching.
When Kelly told me about the sweet smell I immediately thought of the embalming fluid odour that is often associated with Zozzaby's appearances.
When the war ended, the practice of embalming did not, due in part to the fact that chemical companies, which manufactured embalming fluid, also founded the nation's first mortuary schools.
Winston van der Kemp, a colourful Afrikaans-speaking mortician (and former physician) employed by a group of African funeral directors in Cape Town who value his expert technique, explained his own personal 'formula' for embalming fluid, which was perfected after a great deal of his own 'private research' on pauper burials:
Traditional funeral and burial processes bury formaldehyde-containing embalming fluid to the tune of hundreds of thousands of gallons a year, along with more than 2,000 tons of copper and bronze.
The smell of embalming fluid is an intricate part of my sexual memory," she exclaims.
C's allegation that someone tampered with his marijuana raises 2 possibilities: embalming fluid (formaldehyde) toxicity or PCP intoxication.
The first recovery ship to reach the site found so many bodies littering the water that they ran out of embalming fluid and decided to focus only on upper class remains.
Half of what they spend money on is because they think they have to because it's required by law--mainly caskets and embalming fluid.
The wicker casket the family wanted, the request to not use embalming fluid, the desire for a burial without the typical concrete lining in the plot - all proved to be stumbling blocks, Caldwell said.
Embalming fluid is the stuff used to preserve dead bodies.
Formaldehyde is an efficient cellular preservative useful in a variety of industrial settings, most notably, in its use as an embalming fluid.