References in classic literature ?
This was such a new idea to Alice, that she was quite silent for a minute or two, which gave the Pigeon the opportunity of adding, `You're looking for eggs, I know THAT well enough; and what does it matter to me whether you're a little girl or a serpent?
And just because he knew that Nagaina's children were born in eggs like his own, he didn't think at first that it was fair to kill them.
JEMIMA PUDDLE-DUCK came every afternoon; she laid nine eggs in the nest.
Each adult Martian female brings forth about thirteen eggs each year, and those which meet the size, weight, and specific gravity tests are hidden in the recesses of some subterranean vault where the temperature is too low for incubation.
We told her so; but she only waved her feelers, and said we could all lay eggs like Queens if we chose.
Eggs, boilers, hydrangeas, maids--of such were their lives compact.
He had some trouble in breaking the eggs - or rather not so much trouble in breaking them exactly as in getting them into the frying-pan when broken, and keeping them off his trousers, and preventing them from running up his sleeve; but he fixed some half-a-dozen into the pan at last, and then squatted down by the side of the stove and chivied them about with a fork.
It was not to receive his thanks, however, that she hung there in the sky; it was not even to watch him get into the nest; it was to see what he did with her eggs.
I do not know what ever became of that hen, but I believe there are no hens at all in the Land of Oz, and so there could be no eggs there.
He produces many eggs from which we, the workers and the warriors, are hatched; and one in every thousand eggs is another king egg, from which a king is hatched.
During the season, he lived almost entirely on megapode eggs.
And in each stage countless millions of other eggs were deposited in the warm pools of the various races and floated down to the great sea to go through a similar process of evolution outside the womb as develops our own young within; but in Caspak the scheme is much more inclusive, for it combines not only individual development but the evolution of species and genera.
A DOG, used to eating eggs, saw an Oyster and, opening his mouth to its widest extent, swallowed it down with the utmost relish, supposing it to be an egg.
Peter Craig, to whose original story in this issue, "The Battle of the Partridge Eggs," we would call especial attention.
No, indeed; I never care to hatch eggs unless I've a nice snug nest, in some quiet place, with a baker's dozen of eggs under me.