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dead-tree edition

A copy of a written work printed on paper (i.e., the product of "dead" trees), especially that which is also available in a digital format. With everything available online these days, it's a wonder anyone would pay for the dead-tree edition.
See also: edition

bulldog edition

n. the first edition of a newspaper edition to hit the streets. The story appeared in the bulldog edition, but it was all wrong.
See also: edition
References in classic literature ?
Grusczinsky, beaming paternally whenever Annette entered the shop--which was often--announced two new editions in a week.
1878, 4th edition, 1890; Ramsauer (Nicomachean), 1878, Susemihl, 1878,
Kenyon, 1891, 3rd edition, 1892; Kaibel and Wilamowitz - Moel-lendorf,
1891, 3rd edition, 1898; Van Herwerden and Leeuwen (from Kenyon's text), 1891; Blass, 1892, 1895, 1898, 1903; J.
They were not published in the preceding editions of the book for a very simple reason.
They had brought out a first edition of fifteen hundred copies and been dubious of selling it.
1610, a learned Swiss, Isaac Nicholas Nevelet, sent forth the third printed edition of these fables, in a work entitled "Mythologia Aesopica.
Avienus, also a contemporary of Ausonius, put some of these fables into Latin elegiacs, which are given by Nevelet (in a book we shall refer to hereafter), and are occasionally incorporated with the editions of Phaedrus.
7) The original editions and Hawksworth's have Rotherhith here, though earlier in the work, Redriff is said to have been Gulliver's home in England.
Especially interesting are fifteen or twenty first editions of Hawthorne's books inscribed to Mr.
The passages referred to were omitted in the first and all subsequent American editions.
Also, it very frequently got out special editions of from two to five millions.
Of modern editions, the following may be noticed: --
For the "Fragments" of Hesiodic poems the work of Markscheffel, "Hesiodi Fragmenta" (Leipzig, 1840), is most valuable: important also is Kinkel's "Epicorum Graecorum Fragmenta" I (Leipzig, 1877) and the editions of Rzach noticed above.
I hope that the list of available inexpensive editions of the chief authors may suggest a practical method of providing the material, especially for colleges which can provide enough copies for class use.