eat (one's) words

(redirected from eat my words)

eat (one's) words

To retract, regret, or feel foolish about what one has previously said. You think I can't get an A in this class, but I'll make you eat your words when we get our report cards! After my negative prediction for the season, I certainly ate my words when the team started out undefeated.
See also: eat, word

eat (one's) words

Fig. to have to take back one's statements; to confess that one's predictions were wrong. You shouldn't say that to me. I'll make you eat your words. John was wrong about the election and had to eat his words.
See also: eat, word

eat one's words

Be forced to retract something one has said, as in The incumbent won easily, so I had to eat my words. This expression was already proverbial in John Ray's English Proverbs (1670). [Second half of 1500s]
See also: eat, word

eat your words

COMMON If someone has to eat their words, they have to admit that an opinion that they stated publicly has now been proved wrong. He was very doubtful about our chances of success but he'll be eating his words now. The company's chairman has had to eat his words about the company being recession-proof.
See also: eat, word

eat your words

retract what you have said, especially when forced to do so.
See also: eat, word

eat your ˈwords

be forced to admit that what you have said before was wrong: Nick told everyone that he’d be picked for the team, but when he wasn’t chosen he had to eat his words.
See also: eat, word

eat (one's) words

To retract something that one has said.
See also: eat, word
References in classic literature ?
If you, Lawyer Lightwood, had backed me good and true, and if the T'other Governor had took me down correct (I says under my mark), I should have been worth money at the present time, instead of having a barge-load of bad names chucked at me, and being forced to eat my words, which is a unsatisfying sort of food wotever a man's appetite
If however the Labour MPs' in Kirklees do persuade the CCG to revoke their stupid idea, I will eat my words.
By that, I mean a man Stones on wet Wednesday evenings in the Premier League will I start 30 goals then I'll be prepared to eat my words but, having watched him retire from international football with a whimper, I'm still who plays in leagues where he can be a flat-track bully.
And they have shown signs of being able to prove me wrong - and I'd be more than happy to eat my words.
But a minute later Kurtis delivered the perfect cross for my finish so I had to eat my words.
So it's great to be able to split the Red Bulls, and it's great to be ahead of the Ferraris, so I eat my words from yesterday.
I hope I have to eat my words, but I very much doubt it.
It is with pleasure that I will eat my words and offer my sincere congratulations to everyone involved - please pass this on to all those involved - whoever it was, the police, the council, security companies - an excellent job
OUTSPOKEN Wigan chairman Dave Whelan yesterday issued an urgent plea to Sven-Goran Eriksson: "Make me eat my words.
JOHN Prescott has twice made me eat my words since I praised him last Wednesday for staying out of trouble.
In this case, at least, having to eat my words left a good aftertaste.
Blyth boss Paul Baker, critical of his players after Saturday's 3-3 draw at home to Runcorn, admitted today: "They made me eat my words.
Since I was one of those critics, let me eat my words.
AS one who in the past has dismissed Emma Noble as a blonde bimbo on the make, I am now in the unusual position of having to eat my words.
Wales coach Kevin Bowring last night handed Nigel Walker a golden Five Nations Championship opportunity and admitted: "He has a chance to make me eat my words.