eat lunch

eat someone's lunch

Sl. to best someone; to defeat, outwit, or win against someone. (Like a school bully taking away children's lunches and eating them.) The upstart ABC Computer Company is eating IBM's lunch.
See also: eat, lunch
References in classic literature ?
Well, I am the most disinterested among you, after all,' said the first speaker,' for I never wear black gloves, and I never eat lunch.
Our Circadian rhythms mean we tend to feel tired at night, but also around 2pm, so you'll experience an early afternoon dip even if you don't eat lunch.
The workers said they were told to use the back door, excluded from weekly prayer meetings, denied health care and overtime pay and made to eat lunch in a segregated, substandard facility.
Since you need to have time to eat lunch too--food is the fuel that makes your muscles respond to exercise, so don't skip--plan a workout that's simple but quick.
Milne, along with parents, teachers, students and other administrators, boarded a school bus and headed north to eat lunch at a school cafeteria in Pennsylvania.
Out there, packing 175 meals a day -- for the Sunland Senior Center to deliver to homebound seniors -- and setting up and busing tables for 200 seniors who eat lunch each day at ONEGeneration in Van Nuys.
At Newsome's Stile Common Infant and Nursery School children eat lunch in small groups, to represent a family meal.
More than half say they regularly eat lunch at their desk, with over a quarter doing work at the same time.
I would find ways to talk to him after class or eat lunch with him when he wasn't at the teachers' table.
Research reveals that the typical lunch break lasts just 19 minutes for British workers and, with just one in three offices offering a designated place to sit and eat lunch, the majority of workers tend to eat lunch at their desk, with almost seven in 10 choosing to continue to work and eat at the same time.
More workers feel under pressure to eat lunch at their desks
The popular fad to eat lunch at the desk is sending waistlines soaring and storing up a host of obesity-related future health problems.
Most of those polled complained about the UK's long hours culture and having to eat lunch at their desk.
Most eat lunch at their desk although seven per cent do not eat at all while in work, according to the findings.