ease

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at (one's) ease

In a relaxed, comfortable, unencumbered, unembarrassed, and/or unanxious position, manner, or situation. I want you to be at your ease here, so please ask for anything that will make your stay more enjoyable. I'm not under too much pressure; they told me to submit the report at my ease.
See also: ease

ease into (something)

To become gently introduced or accustomed to something new, such as a job or situation. I was really stressed about beginning a job I was so unfamiliar with, but my boss let me ease into it, and I have a good handle on things now. Your grandfather has lived in the same home for over 60 years, so we have to be sure he's eased into living with us.
See also: ease

ease someone into (something)

To gently introduce or accustom someone to something new, such as a job or situation. I was really stressed about beginning a job I was so unfamiliar with, but my boss made sure to ease me into the work. Your grandfather has lived in the same home for over 60 years, so we have to be sure we ease him into living with us.
See also: ease

ease up (on someone or something)

To reduce the pressure or urgency placed on a person, thing, action, or situation. Ease up on the brakes there, we don't want to come to a stop that fast. Would you ease up already? I know I messed up the account, and I don't need you berating me for it further. Ease up on Samantha, she's under a lot of pressure at home.
See also: ease, up

put (oneself) at (one's) ease

To calm, comfort, or reassure oneself; to make oneself comfortable or relaxed. I think we could all put ourselves at ease if we had some personal reassurance from the owners that our jobs weren't in danger. Welcome to my estate, dear guests! I want you to have a most pleasant time here, so please put yourselves at your ease.
See also: ease, put

at ease

without worry or anxiety. The performer is at ease on the stage. After she had met a few people, Mary felt at ease with the group.
See also: ease

ease away (from someone or something)

to pull away from someone or something slowly and carefully. The great ship eased away from the pier. The ship eased away slowly.
See also: away, ease

ease back

(on something) to move something back slowly and carefully. (Usually refers to a throttle or some other control on an airplane or other vehicle.) Ann eased back on the throttle and slowed down. Please ease back on the volume control a little. You will deafen us.
See also: back, ease

ease off

[for something] to diminish. The rain began to ease off. The storm seems to have eased off a little.
See also: ease, off

ease off

(on someone or something ) and ease up (on someone or something ) to reduce the urgency with which one deals with someone or something; to put less pressure on someone or something. Ease off on John. He has been yelled at enough today. Yes, please ease off. I can't stand any more. Tell them to ease up on the horses. They are getting tired.
See also: ease, off

ease off (on someone or something)

 and ease up (on someone or something)
to reduce the urgency with which one deals with someone or something; to put less pressure on someone or something. Ease off on John. He has been yelled at enough today. Yes, please ease off. I can't stand any more. Tell them to ease up on the horses. They are getting tired.
See also: ease, off

ease (on) out

 (of something )
1. . Lit. to continue moving out of something, slowly and carefully. I was able to ease on out of the parking space, but only with difficulty. I looked both ways and eased on out.
2. Fig. to leave something, such as an office or position, quietly and without much embarrassment. The bum finally eased on out of office without much public notice. He eased out while the press was concerned with some other crisis.
See also: ease, out

ease someone (on) out

 (of something )
1. . Lit. to help someone continue to get out of something. We helped ease heron out of the car. With care, we eased her on out. After taking a look around, Tom eased himself out of the opening.
2. Fig. to help someone decide to leave something, such as an office or position, quietly and without much embarrassment. The scandal eased her on out of office in a way that an election might not have. The scandal eased her on out.
See also: ease, out

ease someone or something along

to help someone or something to move along, very carefully. Just ease the piano along little by little. She eased the shy child along.
See also: ease

ease (someone or something) down

(from something ) to bring someone or something downward from something gently. The rescuers eased the injured hiker down from the mountain. They eased down the hiker carefully.
See also: down, ease

ease someone out of something

 and ease someone out 
1. . Lit. to get someone out of something carefully. The paramedics eased the injured man out of the wreckage. Please ease out the patient carefully.
2. Fig. to get someone out of an office or position quietly and without much embarrassment. We eased the sheriff out of office with out a fight. The board eased out the chairman by offering him a huge bonus.
See also: ease, of, out

ease up

(on someone or something ) Go to ease off (on someone or something).
See also: ease, up

ill at ease

uneasy; anxious. I feel ill at ease about the interview. You look ill at ease. Please relax.
See also: ease, ill

put one at (one's) ease

Fig. to cause someone to relax or feel welcome. She usually tells a little joke to put you at your ease. Please do something to put me at ease.
See also: ease, one, put

set someone's mind at ease (about someone or something)

to make someone feel mentally comfortable about someone or something. Alice is upset. I will have to do something to set her mind at ease about the accident. Please set your mind at ease. Everything will be all right.
See also: ease, mind, set

with ease

without effort. The smart student passed the test with ease. The gymnast did a back flip with ease.
See also: ease

at ease

relaxed and comfortable The girl behind the bar was completely at ease, chatting with her customers as she mixed their drinks.
Usage notes: often used in the form put someone at ease (make someone comfortable): We were greeted by a young woman who immediately put us at ease.
Opposite of: ill at ease
See also: ease

ill at ease

worried and uncomfortable The old gentleman obviously felt ill at ease while he waited to have his hair cut.
Opposite of: at ease
See also: ease, ill

put somebody's mind at ease

also set somebody's mind at ease
to cause someone to stop worrying He chose his words carefully to put his mother's mind at ease.
Usage notes: also used in the forms put someone's mind at rest and set someone's mind at rest: To put his mind at rest, I offered to make one final check.
See also: ease, mind, put

be ill at ease

to feel anxious or embarrassed (often + with ) He always felt a little ill at ease with strangers. (sometimes + in ) The girl behind the bar looked ill at ease in her uniform.
See also: ease, ill

at ease

1. Also, at one's ease. Comfortable, relaxed, unembarrassed, as in I always feel at ease in my grandmother's house. The related idiom put at ease means "make comfortable, reassure," as in I was worried that the letter would not arrive in time, but the postmaster put me at ease . [1300s] For the antonym, see ill at ease.
2. In a relaxed position in military ranks. The phrase is often used as a command for troops standing at attention to relax, as in At ease, squadron. The command stand at ease is slightly different. A British military dictionary of 1802 described it as standing with the right foot drawn back about six inches and one's weight put on it. An American version is to stand with one's feet slightly apart and the hands clasped behind one's back.
See also: ease

ease off

1. Also, ease up. Lessen in severity, relax; abate. For example, I wish you'd ease off on Harold; he's doing the best he can, or The wind's eased up so I think the storm is just about over. [Late 1800s] Also see let up.
2. Fall away, gradually decrease, as in The market's easing off, so we may get some stocks more cheaply. [Late 1800s]
See also: ease, off

ease out

Extract or remove someone or something gradually or gently. For example, He carefully eased the car out of the garage, or We were trying to ease him out of office without a public scandal. [Mid-1900s]
See also: ease, out

ill at ease

Uncomfortable, uneasy, as in Large parties made him feel ill at ease. [c. 1300] For an antonym, see at ease.
See also: ease, ill

ease back

v.
1. To move something backward slowly and gently: The pilot eased back the control stick and the plane began to rise. You'll be more comfortable in the airplane if you ease the seat back and take a nap. I realized I was speeding, so I eased back on the accelerator.
2. To act with less intensity or severity: The school has eased back on punishments for being late. The teachers were criticizing the students very harshly, so the principal asked them to ease back.
See also: back, ease

ease off

v.
1. To diminish gradually in intensity or severity: My headache eased off after I took an aspirin.
2. To move away from someone or something slowly and carefully: The snake eased off from the mongoose. Better ease off—they have a gun.
3. To treat someone less severely: The principal eased off on the student and only gave a warning. The coach has made us practice very hard and hasn't eased off for days.
See also: ease, off

at ease

1. In a relaxed position, especially standing silently at rest with the right foot stationary: put the soldiers at ease while waiting for inspection.
2. Used as a command for troops to assume a relaxed position.
See also: ease

ill at ease

Anxious or unsure; uneasy: The stranger made me feel ill at ease.
See also: ease, ill
References in periodicals archive ?
The pause in the expansion during the spring had eased pressures on resources, as evidenced in part by anecdotal reports of lessening labor shortages in some areas and reduced use of overtime work by some firms, and the higher rate of inflation experienced during the early months of the year seemed unlikely to persist.
While they could support a slight adjustment to policy at this point, these members were persuaded that the stance of monetary policy probably would need to be eased by more than a slight amount over time to accommodate the intermediate- and long-term needs of an expanding economy.
Evidence that the Federal Reserve had eased the federal funds rate 25 basis points on August 6 triggered a new round of selling of the dollar against the mark that took the exchange rate briefly below DM1.
During the first two weeks of September, the dollar eased more than 3 percent against the mark to just under DM1.
Under these circumstances, the pace of the dollar's decline against the mark slowed during the second half of September, even as the exchange rate eased to its low for the period under review of DM 1.
Members noted that monetary policy had been eased in several steps over the course of recent weeks; while substantial additional easing might not be needed under prevailing conditions, a limited further move would provide some added insurance in cushioning the economy against the possibility of a deepening recession and an inadequate rebound in the economy without imposing an unwarranted risk of stimulating inflation later.
On August 1, Chairman Greenspan confirmed in Senate testimony that the Federal Reserve had modestly eased its stance the previous week.
During the second week of October, the federal funds rate moved lower, and by midmonth, market participants concluded that the Federal Reserve had indeed eased.