earthly

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earthly desires

Desires for tangible things (such as wealth, property, or other material goods) or for pleasures of the body (such as sexual activity, gluttony, or other hedonistic pursuits). Buddhism teaches us to try to let go of our earthly desires, freeing our minds and bodies for a state of enlightenment. Because our earthly desires are a reflection of our sins, we should shun them if we wish to receive God's light.
See also: desire, earthly

no earthly reason

no conceivable reason. There is no earthly reason for your rude behavior. I can think of no earthly reason why the repairs should cost so much.
See also: earthly, reason

not have an earthly chance

Also, stand no earthly chance. Have no chance whatever, as in She doesn't have an earthly chance of getting into medical school, or Bill stands no earthly chance of winning the lottery. The use of no earthly in the sense of "no conceivable" dates from the mid-1700s.
See also: chance, earthly, have, not

no earthly reason

n. no conceivable reason. I can think of no earthly reason why the repairs should cost so much.
See also: earthly, reason
References in periodicals archive ?
Solo and his love interest, the feisty Princess Leia, built the psychological bridge between adult earthliness and Star Wars creatures of that other galaxy.
With the passing of time, I noticed more and more things in Cortona, as a journal entry following my last visit in 1989 testifies: the Saturday fair; the cemetery right next to the wall circumscribing the town; the union of two different pieties, the wonderful heavenliness of Fra Angelico and the grim earthliness of Luca da Cortona.
The attractive, but understated 37-year-old mother of two boys exudes an old-world courtesy and responds to your questions with pithy earthliness.
trying to raise herself above her earthliness, yet the way she conveys
In Jan van Eyck's pictures, especially those in which torpid saints and ecclesiastics gather bejewelled among the artifacts of the Burgundian court, there is always an incipience, though never more, of earthliness.
Johnson's is far more upbeat, moving in a general direction from earthliness toward heavenly spirituality, a contrast to Clough's doubts and desperation, supplementing critiques that suggest sources in Arnold and the Pre-Raphaelites.
And evidently the ghost's punishment and its fires have not yet burned away its earthliness with its deep-rooted passion, not taught it Christian forgiveness.