ear

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References in classic literature ?
Blake cut an ear from a dead man's head, together with the ear-drum and the associated bones.
Presently I got to stopping my ears with my fingers.
But like all sounds that fall on our ears in a state of abstraction, it had no distinct character, but was simply loud and startling, so that she felt uncertain whether she had interpreted it rightly.
said Moti Guj, and that was all-that and the forebent ears.
The priest walked straight up to him, but strangely enough did not even glance at his ears.
That instant, when Nicholas saw the wolf struggling in the gully with the dogs, while from under them could be seen her gray hair and outstretched hind leg and her frightened choking head, with her ears laid back (Karay was pinning her by the throat), was the happiest moment of his life.
Why, a horse has bigger ears than a man; and a donkey has bigger ears than a horse," explained Tip.
Any indignity that Villa Kennan chose to inflict upon him he was throbbingly glad to receive, such as doubling his ears inside out till they stuck, at the same time making him sit upright, with helpless forefeet paddling the air for equilibrium, while she blew roguishly in his face and nostrils.
And Michael, ears cocked and eyes intent, gazed at this stranger who seemed never to have been a stranger at all.
The two men were bent over the sled and trying to right it, when Henry observed One Ear sidling away.
After a time he observed that the Elephant shook his ears very often, and he inquired what was the matter and why his ears moved with such a tremor every now and then.
On earth I was the Poetess of Reform, and sang to inattentive ears.
Then she added, with a gesture of her head that set the little bells on her ears to tingling: "How do you like my new ear-rings?
Anne had not noticed Owen Ford's ears, but she did see his teeth, as his lips parted over them in a frank and friendly smile.
In the course of the winter I threw out half a bushel of ears of sweet corn, which had not got ripe, on to the snow-crust by my door, and was amused by watching the motions of the various animals which were baited by it.