eagle eye

(redirected from eagle-eyed)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

eagle eye

1. Excellent eyesight, especially for something in particular. I have an eagle eye for spotting wildlife.
2. An ability to discern small details; a keen skill of observation. We need to get Sally's eagle eye on this manuscript because she'll be sure to spot any errors.
3. An attentive gaze. You need to keep an eagle eye on the kids because they will get into everything the minute you turn your back.
See also: eagle, eye

eagle eye

acute eyesight; an intently watchful eye. (From the sharp eyesight of the eagle.) The students wrote their essays under the eagle eye of the headmaster. The umpire kept his eagle eye on the tennis match.
See also: eagle, eye

eagle eye

Unusually keen sight; also, keen intellectual vision. For example, Antiques dealers have an eagle eye for valuable objects, or A good manager has an eagle eye for employee errors. [Late 1500s]
See also: eagle, eye

an eagle eye

If someone has an eagle eye, they watch things carefully and are good at noticing things. No antiques shop, market or furniture shop escapes her eagle eye. Phil's played first-class cricket for five years in England under the eagle eye of our umpires. You must watch builders with an eagle eye because some will cheat the minute you turn your back. Note: You can also say that someone keeps an eagle eye on someone or something. Managers of Europe's top clubs are keeping an eagle eye on the World Championships, hoping to snap up new talent. Note: You can also describe someone as eagle-eyed. As the band were passing through security, an eagle-eyed official spotted an 18-inch knife in their luggage. Note: Eagles have very good eyesight, and are able to see small animals or objects from a great height.
See also: eagle, eye

an/somebody’s ˌeagle ˈeye

(informal) if somebody has an eagle eye, they watch things carefully and are good at noticing things: Nothing the staff did escaped the eagle eye of the manager (= he saw everything they did). ▶ ˌeagle-ˈeyed adj.: An eagle-eyed student spotted the mistake.
See also: eagle, eye
References in periodicals archive ?
The eagle-eyed team also takes part in information days, events and a range of activities designed to attract involvement of other young people in the area.
the premier e-commerce source for discount inkjet supplies, is offering eagle-eyed web surfers a unique challenge: find any spelling or grammatical errors on the company's newly redesigned site and win a 10% coupon for your next purchase at http://shop.
An eagle-eyed snack fan found the startling image as he tucked into the tasty treat.
But he will have to hope that the Tartan Army are not too eagle-eyed about what Sky pictures recently revealed to be his pride and joy in his living room cabinet.
EAGLE-EYED staff on Moseley's excellent webmag Moseley Matters spotted this gem from the RFU's website, which reported that East Midlands Society referee Robert Tustin was suspended from officiating for 18 weeks by a disciplinary panel.
And the system has already had one success - police picked up a stolen car in Stockbridge Village regeneration manager for after a tip-off from an eagle-eyed resident.
The works, by 18th century Italian master Canaletto, were unearthed by the centre's owner in a country barn but their true value only came to light when an eagle-eyed insurer came to evaluate the contents.
EAGLE-eyed fans of the Harry Potter film have spotted a wizard item on sale in Diagon Alley - a Celtic strip.
It was really eagle-eyed of the Celtic fans who grabbed the chance of a bargain while holidaying there.
Asda said: "We apologise to the eagle-eyed bargain-hunters.
EAGLE-eyed residents could find themselves in something of a flap next week.
But the Corporation had to back-track after an eagle-eyed viewer complained the in-house poll had received just seven responses.
But the eagle-eyed among you may feel that with Bonnie and Charly, she still needs one more addition to make a right Royal family.
EAGLE-eyed residents will be able to spot the signs of summer during a ramble through a local nature reserve.