dynamite

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dynamite charge

An encouragement to a divided jury to come to a verdict. It is also known as the "Allen charge" because such a tactic was employed for the deadlocked jury in the 1896 case Allen v. United States. Come on, let's give the jury a dynamite charge, in the hopes of getting all the jurors to reach a consensus.
See also: charge, dynamite

dynamite

1. n. anything potentially powerful: a drug, news, a person. The story about the scandal was dynamite and kept selling papers for a month.
2. mod. excellent; powerful. I want some more of your dynamite enchiladas, please.
References in classic literature ?
They make balloons, kites, dynamite bombs, and electrical apparatus.
It came when he was full of gin, and we, being in the same fix, just watched him shove a cap and short fuse into a stick of dynamite and stroll down toward the boat.
The next day the cook announced that he would rather take his chance with dynamite than continue trying to exist on coconut, and that, though he didn't know anything about dynamite, he knew a sight too much about coconut.
Therefore, when they spotted a school of mullet; and lighted the fuse, they had to hold the dynamite till the fuse burned short before they threw it.
When I stood up, fire-stick in one hand, dynamite stick in the other, my knees were knocking together.
I threw the fire-stick into the water after the mullet and held on to the dynamite.
A shock to a mass of dynamite produces quite different effects from an equal shock to a mass of steel: in the one case there is a vast explosion, while in the other case there is hardly any noticeable disturbance.
Similarly dynamite may be exploded, thereby displaying its characteristic properties, or may (with due precautions) be carted about like any other mineral.