duke


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

dine with Duke Humphrey

To go without dinner. The phrase refers to the story of a man who, while visiting the tomb of Duke Humphrey of Gloucester, was locked in the abbey—and thus missed dinner. A: "Why are you so hungry? Didn't you eat dinner?" B: "No, I got stuck in a meeting, so I dined with Duke Humphrey!"
See also: dine, duke

duke it out

Sl. to have a fistfight. John told George to meet him in the alley so they could duke it out.
See also: duke, out

duke someone out

Sl. to knock someone out. Wilbur tried to duke the guy out first. Bob duked out the mugger with a jab to the cheek.
See also: duke, out

put up one's dukes

Fig. to be prepared to fight. He's telling you to put up your dukes. Put up your dukes and be a man!
See also: duke, put, up

duke it out

to compete against someone or something The airlines are duking it out, offering better service and cheaper fares as a way of attracting passengers.
Usage notes: often used in newspaper writing to describe competition between political candidates: Candidates are still duking it out in state primaries, with no one the clear winner yet.
Related vocabulary: fight it out
Etymology: based on the slang meaning of duke (to hit or fight someone with your hands)
See also: duke, out

dook

and duke (duk)
1. mod. really bad. (see also the entry for duke.) This day was really dook!
2. in. to defecate. Mom, I gotta dook.
3. to perform anal sex. (Offensive if understood.) The dude wanted to dook me!

duke

verb
See dook

duke

1. in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. (see also dukes.) She’s in the john, duking like a goat.
2. Go to dook.

duke it out

phr. to have a fistfight. John told George to meet him in the alley so they could duke it out.
See also: duke, out

duke someone out

tv. to knock someone out. (see also dukes.) Wilbur tried to duke the guy out first.
See also: duke, out

dukes

1. n. the fists. Okay, brother, put your dukes up.
2. n. the knees. He went down on his dukes and prayed for all sorts of good stuff.
See also: duke

Put up your dukes!

A challenge to fight. The “dukes” in question were fists, which the challenged party was asked to clench in preparation to trying to punch his opponent. But why “dukes?” The word comes from Cockney rhyming slang “Duke of York,” meaning “fork,” held at mealtimes by a clenched fist. Similarly, “duke it out” remains a general term for fighting.
See also: put, up
References in classic literature ?
The duke, however, overcame all difficulties with a word -- his majesty's order; and, in spite of the protestations which the master of ceremonies made for the honor of his office and principles, Villefort was introduced.
The king was seated in the same place where the duke had left him.
Sire, the duke is right, and I believe your majesty will think it equally important.
When all the actions of the duke are recalled, I do not know how to blame him, but rather it appears to be, as I have said, that I ought to offer him for imitation to all those who, by the fortune or the arms of others, are raised to government.
Therefore, above everything, the duke ought to have created a Spaniard Pope, and, failing him, he ought to have consented to Rouen and not San Pietro ad Vincula.
Stop," said the duke, "Pistache, jump for the queen.
And now," said the duke, raising it still six inches higher, "jump for the king.
Besides," said the duke, "no one knows you are listening to me.
Listen to me, duke," and hereupon the dignified features of the queen assumed a solemn expression.
Instead of using funds he held in trust, he took advantage of the Duke's carelessness to put the family in a financial hole, in which it might be necessary for the Duke to let him hold them in reality.
The lawyer's name was Isaac Green, but the Duke always called him Elisha; presumably in reference to the fact that he was quite bald, though certainly not more than thirty.
It is the most remarkable case I ever heard of in my life," the Duke admitted, helping himself to a cigarette from a box which he had just discovered.
They don't suggest, I suppose," the Duke asked, "that we are not trying to clear the matter up?
So far as you are concerned, Duke," the Prince said, "your responsibility ceases with ordinary membership.
I thank you, Saxe Leinitzer," the Duke said coldly, "but it is beginning to occur to me that I have had enough of your explanations.