dug


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dig in (one's) heels

To cling stubbornly to one's beliefs or wishes. Please let me tell my side of the story before you dig in your heels on this, OK? Well, I told Grace she can't go, and now she's dug in her heels as if this party is the most important thing in her life.
See also: dig, heel

dig (one's) own grave

To do something that has or will have negative consequences that are easily able to be foreseen. If you don't turn in your project, you're digging your own grave. There's no way you'll get a decent grade without it! I'm afraid I'm digging my own grave by turning down the promotion.
See also: dig, grave, own

dig (one's) heels in

To cling stubbornly to one's beliefs or wishes. Please let me tell my side of the story before you dig your heels in on this, OK? Well, I told Grace she can't go, and now she's dug her heels in as if this party is the most important thing in her life.
See also: dig, heel

dig deep

1. To exert oneself mentally or physically. I was so exhausted when overtime started that I really had to dig deep to keep playing.
2. To spend a lot of money on something. We had to dig deep after our construction budget ballooned beyond what we had planned.
See also: deep, dig

dig down

1. Literally, to dig a hole into something, such as the ground. I had to dig down and create holes in the soil before I could plant the flowers.
2. To spend one's money. We had to dig down after our construction budget ballooned beyond what we had planned.
See also: dig, down

dig for (something)

1. Literally, to dig in search of something that has been buried. My dog has been digging for something out in the yard all morning—I wonder if he buried a bone.
2. By extension, to try to uncover negative information about someone or something. I've been digging for scandalous information on her but have been unsuccessful so far.
See also: dig

dig in(to) (something)

1. Literally, to dig a hole into something, such as the ground. I had to dig into the soil and create for the flowers.
2. To start eating, often eagerly or excitedly. Well, dig in before your dinner gets cold. Mom's lasagna is always so good—I can't wait to dig in!
3. To work energetically. Thanks to the whole department digging in, we were able to get that report finished on time.
4. To poke or prod someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "in" to refer either to the person or thing being jabbed or to the person or thing doing the jabbing. The dog might bite you if you keep digging it in its side like that. I dug a toothpick into the cake to see if it was fully cooked.
5. To create protective trenches, as in trench warfare. Once we're dug in here, I think we'll be able to hold this area.
6. To place one's hands in something, usually in an attempt to find something. Here, dig into my purse and see if you can find my sunglasses.
See also: dig

dig out

1. To channel out of something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "out." The groundhog dug out of its burrow and advanced on my herb garden.
2. To remove something from something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "out." Paulina was careful to dig every last raisin out of the oatmeal raisin cookie.
3. To locate something after searching for it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "out." After a few minutes, I was finally able to dig my sunglasses out of my purse.
See also: dig, out

dig out of (something)

To channel or tunnel out of something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "out." The groundhog dug out of its burrow and advanced on my herb garden.
See also: dig, of, out

dig some dirt up

To uncover negative information about someone or something. Once I contact my usual sources at the tabloids, I should be able to dig some dirt up on that actress.
See also: dig, dirt, up

dig the dirt

To find negative information that has been concealed. Once I contact my usual sources at the tabloids, I should be able to dig the dirt up on that actress.
See also: dig, dirt

dig up

1. verb Literally, to overturn soil or a similar substance by digging. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "up." The dog keeps burying bones and then digs up the yard to try to find them.
2. verb To unearth or uproot something by digging. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "up." That darn groundhog has dug up my herb garden for the second year in a row.
3. verb To search for and find something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "up." If you give me some time, I'm sure I can dig up the deed to the house.
4. verb To uncover negative information about someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "up." Once I contact my usual sources at the tabloids, I should be able to dig up some dirt on that actress.
5. slang, expression Listen! Hey, the boss is talking—dig up!
See also: dig, up

dig up (one's) tomahawk

To become angry. Of course he dug up his tomahawk—you insulted him in front of the whole town!
See also: dig, tomahawk, up

dig up dirt

To uncover negative information about someone or something. Once I contact my usual sources at the tabloids, I should be able to dig up dirt on that actress.
See also: dig, dirt, up

dig down

 and dig deep 
1. . Lit. to excavate deeply. They are really having to dig deep to reach bedrock. We are not to the buried cable yet. We will have to dig down some more.
2. Fig. to be generous; to dig deep into one's pockets and come up with as much money as possible to donate to something. (As if digging into one's pocket.) Please dig down. We need every penny you can spare. Dig down deep. Give all you can.
See also: dig, down

dig out (of something)

to channel or excavate one's way out of something. The miner had to dig out of the cave-in. They were too exhausted to dig out.
See also: dig, out

dig some dirt up (on someone)

Fig. to find out something bad about someone. If you don't stop trying to dig some dirt up on me, I'll get a lawyer and sue you. The citizens' group dug up some dirt on the mayor and used it against her at election time.
See also: dig, dirt, up

dig someone or something up

Fig. to go to great effort to find someone or something. (There is an implication that the thing or person dug up is not the most desirable, but is all that could be found.) Mary dug a date up for the dance next Friday. I dug up a recipe for roast pork with pineapple. I dug up a carpenter who doesn't charge very much.
See also: dig, up

dig something out

Fig. to work hard to locate something and bring it forth. They dug the contract out of the file cabinet. I dug out an old dress and wore it to the Fifties party.
See also: dig, out

dig down

Pay with money from one's own pocket; be generous. For example, We've got to dig down deep to make the next payment. [Colloquial; c. 1940]
See also: dig, down

dig out

1. Extract, remove, as in He was determined to dig out every bit of metal he could find. [Late 1300s]
2. Find by searching for, as in He dug out his first contract from the file. [Mid-1800s]
See also: dig, out

dig up

1. Search out, find, obtain, as in I'm sure I can dig up a few more supporters. [Mid-1800s]
2. dig up some dirt or the dirt . Find derogatory information about someone or something. For example, The editor assigned him to dig up all the dirt on the candidates. The slangy use of the noun dirt for "embarrassing or scandalous information" dates from about 1840, but this metaphoric expression is a century newer.
See also: dig, up

dig up dirt

BRITISH & AMERICAN or

dig the dirt

BRITISH
COMMON If you dig up dirt or dig the dirt on someone, you look for harmful or shocking information about them. They hired a detective firm to dig up dirt on their rival. Note: You can also say that you dig for dirt. Reporters even go through trash cans digging for dirt on celebrities. Note: You can describe this activity as dirt-digging. In the movie, a dirt-digging reporter is framed by a corrupt district attorney and sentenced for manslaughter.
See also: dig, dirt, up

dig deep

1 give money or other resources generously. 2 make a great effort to do something. informal
The idea here is of thrusting your hands deep into your pockets to find money with which to pay for something.
2 1991 Sports Illustrated You really have to dig deep night after night to get up for every game.
See also: deep, dig

dig the dirt (or dig up dirt)

discover and reveal damaging information about someone. informal
Dirt is commonly used as a metaphor for unsavoury gossip or scandal, as in, for example, dish the dirt (see dish).
See also: dig, dirt

dig ˈdeep


1 search thoroughly for information: You’ll need to dig deep into the records to find the figures you want.
2 try hard to provide the money, equipment, etc. that is needed: We’re asking you to dig deep for the earthquake victims.
See also: deep, dig

dig out

v.
1. To create a space or structure by digging: The fox dug a shelter out of the dense earth. The workers dug out a moat around the castle.
2. To create some pathway that leads from some place by digging: The prisoners dug a tunnel out of the dungeon.
3. To expose, gain access to, or free something by digging and removing what surrounds it: They worked around the clock to dig out the city after the blizzard. The nurse dug the splinter out of my finger with a needle.
4. To emerge or become accessible by or as if by digging: It took three weeks for the village to dig out after the mudslide.
See also: dig, out

dig up

v.
1. To unearth or expose and gain access to something by digging: The scientists dug up a dinosaur fossil. The landscapers dug the tree up and replanted it.
2. To scatter earth, snow, or another substance on some surface by digging into it: The woodchucks dug up my lawn last night.
3. To discover or find something through concerted effort: I dug up some old photos that were in the back of my closet. The detective intended to dig the truth up.
See also: dig, up
References in periodicals archive ?
A local beneficiary from this dug well said that there was great shortage of drinking water and now women folk of the area also carrying drinking water at night time.
This is most noticeable in early spring, when growth on undug soil is generally faster by comparison with dug soil, whose fertility, in terms of soil life, is still recovering from the winter digging.
The little-known hobby of 'bottle digging' has seen up to six foot deep holes dug on public land to uncover a huge haul of bottles and other items dating back to the Victorian period.
There are another 23 oil wells, being excavated by a leading contractor, along with international service companies, as sub-contractors for the International INAI, Axcel, Lock-Oil Companies, as well as 15 wells being dug through cooperation with Halliburton Company in southern Iraq's Majnoun Oil Field," Yassiri said.
If you are preparing the bed to plant trees, shrubs or perennials, you can just leave it when you've dug it over.
However, the beds are likely to have been dug deeply when they were first created.
The fossils that a few dozen other people and I dug up will help scientists understand more about what this ancient environment was like and what types of animals and plants lived there.
The small shelf that we've dug into the hillside can barely accommodate all the dig-team members who want to get in on the action.
Dug, I hear you bleed occasionally when you're singing.
dug will allow men to finally have the ability to wear their favorite down time clothing around the house, as well as venture outside in the same outfit.
The DUG website is the central gathering point for the Dynamo user community," explained Tom McFadyen, President, McFadyen Consulting, "Creating and managing the DUG site is an honor for McFadyen Consulting.
They can literally be dug over in late spring and planted immediately.
In early April of 2000, a bed of five feet by 10 feet was double dug using the method of Jeavons and Cox in The Sustainable Vegetable Garden, Ten Speed Press, 1999.
Then I dug the real high priest, in shades and another tam, looking past all of us into the hipnopocity of everything, Monk.
Namco Offers a Twist on a Classic with Dig Dug REMIX