dug


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dig in (one's) heels

To cling stubbornly to one's beliefs or wishes. Please let me tell my side of the story before you dig in your heels on this, OK? Well, I told Grace she can't go, and now she's dug in her heels as if this party is the most important thing in her life.
See also: dig, heel

dig (one's) own grave

To do something that has or will have negative consequences that are easily able to be foreseen. If you don't turn in your project, you're digging your own grave. There's no way you'll get a decent grade without it! I'm afraid I'm digging my own grave by turning down the promotion.
See also: dig, grave, own

dig (one's) heels in

To cling stubbornly to one's beliefs, position, or wishes. Please let me tell my side of the story before you dig your heels in on this, OK? I told Grace she can't go, and now she's dug her heels in as if this party is the most important thing in her life.
See also: dig, heel

dig deep

1. To exert oneself mentally or physically. I was so exhausted when overtime started that I really had to dig deep to keep playing.
2. To spend a lot of money on something. We had to dig deep after our construction budget ballooned beyond what we had planned.
See also: deep, dig

dig down

1. Literally, to dig a hole into something, such as the ground. I had to dig down and create holes in the soil before I could plant the flowers.
2. To spend one's money. We had to dig down after our construction budget ballooned beyond what we had planned.
See also: dig, down

dig for (something)

1. Literally, to dig in search of something that has been buried. My dog has been digging for something out in the yard all morning—I wonder if he buried a bone.
2. By extension, to investigate in an attempt to uncover information about someone or something, often negative information. I've been digging for scandalous information on her but have been unsuccessful so far.
See also: dig

dig in(to) (something)

1. Literally, to dig a hole into something, such as the ground. I had to dig into the soil and create a hole for the flowers.
2. To investigate in an attempt to uncover information about someone or something, often negative information. I've been digging into the archives for any information on her past, but I haven't found a single thing.
3. To start eating, often eagerly or excitedly. Well, dig in before your dinner gets cold. Mom's lasagna is always so good—I can't wait to dig into it!
4. To work energetically. Thanks to the whole department digging in, we were able to get that report finished on time.
5. To poke or prod someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "in" to refer either to the person or thing being jabbed or to the thing doing the jabbing. The dog might bite you if you keep digging it in its side like that. I dug a toothpick into the cake to see if it was fully cooked.
6. To create protective trenches, as in trench warfare. Once we're dug in here, I think we'll be able to hold this area.
7. To place one's hands in something, usually in an attempt to find something. Here, dig into my purse and see if you can find my sunglasses.
See also: dig

dig out

1. To create an exit by channeling, tunneling, etc. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "out." The groundhog dug out of its burrow and advanced on my herb garden.
2. To remove something from something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "out." Paulina was careful to dig every last raisin out of the cookie.
3. To locate something after searching for it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "out." After a few minutes, I was finally able to dig my sunglasses out of my purse.
4. To remove an excess accumulation of something, such as snow or mud. It'll be days before we're able to dig out from this blizzard. Rescue crews have been helping the residents dig out after the mudslide.
See also: dig, out

dig out of (something)

To create an exit by channeling, tunneling, etc. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "out." The groundhog dug out of its burrow and advanced on my herb garden.
See also: dig, of, out

dig some dirt up

To uncover negative information about someone or something. Once I contact my usual sources at the tabloids, I should be able to dig some dirt up on that actress.
See also: dig, dirt, up

dig the dirt

To find negative information that has been concealed. Once I contact my usual sources at the tabloids, I should be able to dig the dirt up on that actress.
See also: dig, dirt

dig up

1. Literally, to overturn soil or a similar substance by digging. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "up." That darn groundhog has dug up my herb garden for the second year in a row.
2. To unearth or uproot something by digging. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "up." The dog keeps burying bones and digging them up.
3. To search for and find something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "up." If you give me some time, I'm sure I can dig up the deed to the house.
4. To uncover negative information about someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dig" and "up." Once I contact my usual sources at the tabloids, I should be able to dig up some dirt on that actress.
5. slang Listen! Hey, the boss is talking—dig up!
See also: dig, up

dig up (one's) tomahawk

To become angry. Of course he dug up his tomahawk—you insulted him in front of the whole town!
See also: dig, tomahawk, up

dig up dirt

To uncover negative information about someone or something. Once I contact my usual sources at the tabloids, I should be able to dig up dirt on that actress.
See also: dig, dirt, up

dig down

 and dig deep 
1. . Lit. to excavate deeply. They are really having to dig deep to reach bedrock. We are not to the buried cable yet. We will have to dig down some more.
2. Fig. to be generous; to dig deep into one's pockets and come up with as much money as possible to donate to something. (As if digging into one's pocket.) Please dig down. We need every penny you can spare. Dig down deep. Give all you can.
See also: dig, down

dig out (of something)

to channel or excavate one's way out of something. The miner had to dig out of the cave-in. They were too exhausted to dig out.
See also: dig, out

dig some dirt up (on someone)

Fig. to find out something bad about someone. If you don't stop trying to dig some dirt up on me, I'll get a lawyer and sue you. The citizens' group dug up some dirt on the mayor and used it against her at election time.
See also: dig, dirt, up

dig someone or something up

Fig. to go to great effort to find someone or something. (There is an implication that the thing or person dug up is not the most desirable, but is all that could be found.) Mary dug a date up for the dance next Friday. I dug up a recipe for roast pork with pineapple. I dug up a carpenter who doesn't charge very much.
See also: dig, up

dig something out

Fig. to work hard to locate something and bring it forth. They dug the contract out of the file cabinet. I dug out an old dress and wore it to the Fifties party.
See also: dig, out

dig down

Pay with money from one's own pocket; be generous. For example, We've got to dig down deep to make the next payment. [Colloquial; c. 1940]
See also: dig, down

dig out

1. Extract, remove, as in He was determined to dig out every bit of metal he could find. [Late 1300s]
2. Find by searching for, as in He dug out his first contract from the file. [Mid-1800s]
See also: dig, out

dig up

1. Search out, find, obtain, as in I'm sure I can dig up a few more supporters. [Mid-1800s]
2. dig up some dirt or the dirt . Find derogatory information about someone or something. For example, The editor assigned him to dig up all the dirt on the candidates. The slangy use of the noun dirt for "embarrassing or scandalous information" dates from about 1840, but this metaphoric expression is a century newer.
See also: dig, up

dig up dirt

BRITISH & AMERICAN or

dig the dirt

BRITISH
COMMON If you dig up dirt or dig the dirt on someone, you look for harmful or shocking information about them. They hired a detective firm to dig up dirt on their rival. Note: You can also say that you dig for dirt. Reporters even go through trash cans digging for dirt on celebrities. Note: You can describe this activity as dirt-digging. In the movie, a dirt-digging reporter is framed by a corrupt district attorney and sentenced for manslaughter.
See also: dig, dirt, up

dig deep

1 give money or other resources generously. 2 make a great effort to do something. informal
The idea here is of thrusting your hands deep into your pockets to find money with which to pay for something.
2 1991 Sports Illustrated You really have to dig deep night after night to get up for every game.
See also: deep, dig

dig the dirt (or dig up dirt)

discover and reveal damaging information about someone. informal
Dirt is commonly used as a metaphor for unsavoury gossip or scandal, as in, for example, dish the dirt (see dish).
See also: dig, dirt

dig ˈdeep


1 search thoroughly for information: You’ll need to dig deep into the records to find the figures you want.
2 try hard to provide the money, equipment, etc. that is needed: We’re asking you to dig deep for the earthquake victims.
See also: deep, dig

dig out

v.
1. To create a space or structure by digging: The fox dug a shelter out of the dense earth. The workers dug out a moat around the castle.
2. To create some pathway that leads from some place by digging: The prisoners dug a tunnel out of the dungeon.
3. To expose, gain access to, or free something by digging and removing what surrounds it: They worked around the clock to dig out the city after the blizzard. The nurse dug the splinter out of my finger with a needle.
4. To emerge or become accessible by or as if by digging: It took three weeks for the village to dig out after the mudslide.
See also: dig, out

dig up

v.
1. To unearth or expose and gain access to something by digging: The scientists dug up a dinosaur fossil. The landscapers dug the tree up and replanted it.
2. To scatter earth, snow, or another substance on some surface by digging into it: The woodchucks dug up my lawn last night.
3. To discover or find something through concerted effort: I dug up some old photos that were in the back of my closet. The detective intended to dig the truth up.
See also: dig, up
References in periodicals archive ?
Attrition of plants was 25% in the double dug plants and 15% in the single dug bed.
1) Our expected results were for the double dug bed to be the more productive and our bias in better care for the plants would have been on the double dug bed.
2) The appearance of the corn plants at the end of the season showed a clear preponderance of brown leaves on the single dug bed plants compared to the double dug plants.
We know the beds were prepared differently, but why would a single dug bed produce more than a double dug bed?
It may be that the nutrients in the single dug bed, including the added chicken manure, were maintained near the root system of the plants, while the nutrients in the double dug bed were able to leach away to the lower level because of our aeration of that lower level.
The soil in the double dug bed may have drained water more quickly, resulting in less water in the upper level between rains early in the season resulting in stunted plants.
To the east of and adjacent to both experimental beds, more double dug beds were created, exposing the tree roots from the tree that was east of the experimental beds.
Although we think there are plenty of highly productive double dug beds in people's back yards, our experience has shown that there are many factors that enter into the harvest results and until it is studied further, double digging is not a guarantee of higher productivity, and in fact may be counter productive in certain circumstances.
Jackson Woodhollow is showing no mercy on DIG DUG having defeated many an underground foe
com or become a fan of PAC-MAN, DIG DUG and NAMCO NETWORKS.
DUG meets annually to provide and exchange information on Acsis' Data-Link family of products, including DPExchange, DataPass and SAPConsole solutions, and other issues related to improving supply chain, warehousing and manufacturing environments that rely on Acsis' software to improve the performance of SAP R/3 systems.
A primary part of the overall mission of DUG is " to bring together and make available valuable resources from Dynamo experts, end-users, and ATG which enable the entire community to get the most from their IT investments.
New York City, Minneapolis, and San Francisco currently have active DUG chapters that hold events on a regular basis.
org serves as the central point for all DUG chapters and users worldwide.
The others heard his screams, freed themselves and dug him out with their boards.