due


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get (one's) dues

1. To receive the appropriate payment for services or work one has completed. After intense negotiations, rural farmers will finally be getting their dues from the local government.
2. To give someone that which he or she deserves, which can be a reward or retribution, depending on the situation. Don't worry about those stool pigeons, we'll make sure they get their dues. After all her hard work, I really hope Mary finally gets her dues.
See also: due, get

give (someone) (his or her) dues

1. To give someone the appropriate payment for services or work that he or she has done. After intense negotiations, the local government will finally be giving rural farmers their dues.
2. To give someone that which he or she deserves, which can be a reward or retribution, depending on the situation. Don't worry about those stool pigeons, we'll be sure to give them their dues. After all her hard work, I really hope the company finally gives Mary her dues.
See also: due, give

honey-do list

A list or collection of tasks or jobs one has been requested to perform or undertake, especially household duties or jobs, given to a person by his or her spouse or romantic partner. All I want to do on the weekends is relax, but my husband always has some honey-do list for me.
See also: list

credit where credit is due

Acknowledgement of someone's work or contribution to something. Often used in the phrase "give credit where credit is due." Come on, give credit where credit is due! I came up with that idea, and you know it! We may not get along very well with Mitch, but we have to give credit where credit is due—he worked hard on that project.
See also: credit, due

Give credit where credit is due.

Prov. Acknowledge someone's contribution or ability. Jill: Jane, that was a wonderful meal. Jane: I must give credit where credit is due; Alan helped with all of the cooking. Ellen: Roger is pompous, petty, and immature. I think he's completely worthless. Jane: Now, Ellen, give credit where credit is due; he's also extremely smart.
See also: credit, due, give

give the devil his due

 and give the devil her due
Fig. to give your foe proper credit (for something). (This usually refers to a person who has been evil-like the devil.) She's very messy in the kitchen, but I have to give the devil her due. She bakes a terrific cherry pie. John is a bit too nosy, but he keeps his yard clean and is a kind neighbor. I'll give the devil his due.
See also: devil, due, give

in due course

 and in due time; in good time; in the course of time; in time
in a normal or expected amount of time. The roses will bloom in due course. The vice president will become president in due course. I'll retire in due time. Just wait, my dear. All in good time. It'll all work out in the course of time. In time, things will improve.
See also: course, due

pay one's dues

 
1. Lit. to pay the fees required to belong to an organization. If you haven't paid your dues, you can't come to the club picnic. How many people have paid their dues?
2. Fig. to have earned one's right to something through hard work or suffering. He worked hard to get to where he is today. He paid his dues and did what he was told. I have every right to be here. I paid my dues!
See also: due, pay

reflect (back) (up)on someone or something

to remember or think about someone or something. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) When I reflect back on the years I spent with my parents, I think I had a good childhood. I like to reflect on my great-grandmother.
See also: on, reflect

in due course

(slightly formal)
after a certain period in due time They're working on the plan and will announce it in due course.
See also: course, due

due to something

as a result of something because of something Due to computer problems, the checks cannot be mailed this week. Our flight was late due to the bad weather.
See also: due

give somebody their due

to recognize something good about someone This wonderful musician was finally given his due when he was honored at this year's jazz festival.
Usage notes: sometimes used in the form give something its due: It took more than 200 years to give the book its due, but it's now regarded as a classic.
See also: due, give

pay your dues

to earn respect because you worked hard to develop a skill She paid her dues playing in small clubs in New York before an album made her famous.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of dues (money paid to belong to an organization)
See also: due, pay

reflect on something

also reflect upon something
to think seriously about something Her essay invites the reader to reflect on the importance of art in people's lives.
See also: on, reflect

reflect on somebody/something

to influence the reputation of a person, group, or organization The outstanding work of our scientists reflects well on the entire university. If someone on our staff does a bad job, it reflects badly on all of us.
Usage notes: always used with an adverb and said of both good and bad influences on a reputation
See also: on, reflect

with all due respect

with the admiration that is owed With all due respect, I think there are some facts you have not considered.
Usage notes: used to disagree politely with someone
See also: all, due, respect

in due time

(slightly formal)
after a certain period in due course We turned south and in due time found ourselves walking along the shore of the lake.
See also: due, time

give somebody their due

  also give the devil his due
something that you say when you want to describe someone's good qualities after they have done something wrong or after you have criticized them She might be bad at writing letters but I'll give her her due, she always phones me at the end of the month. Geoff usually forgets my birthday, but give the devil his due, he always buys me a lovely Christmas present.
See also: due, give

in due course

  (slightly formal)
if you say that something will happen in due course, you mean that it will happen at a suitable time in the future You will receive notification of the results in due course.
See also: course, due

pay your dues

to work hard or do something unpleasant over a long period in order to achieve something I've looked after four kids for sixteen years, I've paid my dues, and now I want some time to enjoy myself.
See also: due, pay

due to

1. Likely to, announced as, as in Betty bought more of the stock, believing it was due to rise, or The play is due to open next week. [Early 1900s]
2. Attributable to, because of, as in Due to scanty rainfall, we may face a crop failure. This usage has been criticized by some authorities, but today it is widely considered standard. [Early 1900s] Also see on account of.
3. Owing or payable to, as in We must give our staff whatever vacation is due to them.
See also: due

give credit

1. Also, extend credit. Trust someone to pay at some future time what he or she owes. For example, I haven't enough cash this month, so I hope they'll give me credit. This use of credit dates from the mid-1500s.
2. Acknowledge an accomplishment, as in They really should give her credit for the work she's done. [Late 1700s] The phrase is sometimes amplified to give credit where credit is due, meaning the acknowledgment should be to the person who deserves it. This expression was probably coined by Samuel Adams in a letter (October 29, 1777), which put it: "Give credit to whom credit due." It is sometimes put give someone their due, as in We should really give Nancy her due for trying to sort out this mess.
See also: credit, give

give someone his or her due

see under give credit, def. 2.
See also: due, give

give the devil his due

Give credit to what is good in a disagreeable or disliked person. For example, I don't like John's views on education, but give the devil his due, he always has something important to say , or I don't like what the new management has done, but give the devil his due, sales have improved . [Late 1500s]
See also: devil, due, give

in due course

Also, in due course of time; in due time; in time; all in good time. After an appropriate interval, in a reasonable length of time. For example, In due course we'll discuss the details of this arrangement, or In due time the defense will present new evidence, or You'll learn the program in time, or We'll come up with a solution, all in good time. Chaucer used in due time in the late 1300s, and the other usages arose over the next few centuries. However, also see in good time for another meaning.
See also: course, due

pay one's dues

Earn something through hard work, long experience, or suffering. For example, She'd paid her dues in small-town shows before she finally got a Broadway part. This expression transfers the cost of being a paid-up member in an organization to that of gaining experience in an endeavor. [Mid-1900s]
See also: due, pay

reflect on

1. Consider or think carefully about, as in She reflected on her country's role in history. [c. 1600] A closely related phrase is on due reflection, meaning "after careful consideration." For example, On due reflection I decided to vote for the incumbent.
2. reflect on one. Give evidence of one's qualities, as in The hasty preparation of this report will reflect on you. [Second half of 1600s]
See also: on, reflect

with all due respect

Although I think highly of you, as in With all due respect, you haven't really answered my question, or With all due respect, that account doesn't fit the facts. This phrase always precedes a polite disagreement with what a person has said or brings up a controversial point. [c. 1800]
See also: all, due, respect

reflect on

or reflect upon
v.
1. To think carefully about something: He sat in the garden and reflected on what he had just read.
2. To express carefully considered thoughts about something: In the essay, she reflects on her long career and offers advice for young writers.
3. To give evidence of the characteristics or qualities of someone or something: The student's performance reflects well on the whole school. Hasty preparation of the report will reflect badly on you.
4. To appear as a reflected image on some surface: The trees are reflecting on the water.
5. To cause something to appear as a reflected image on some surface: The window reflected wavy lines on the floor.
See also: on, reflect

pay one’s dues

tv. to serve one’s time in a menial role. (see also pay one’s dues (to society).) I spent some time as a bus boy, so I’ve paid my dues in the serving business.
See also: due, pay

pay one’s dues (to society)

tv. to serve a prison or jail sentence. I served ten years in prison. I’ve paid my dues to society. The matter is settled.
See also: due, pay, society

pay one’s dues

verb
See also: due, pay

in due course

At the proper or right time: Things will get better in due course.
See also: course, due

give the devil his due

To give credit to a disagreeable or malevolent person.
See also: devil, due, give

pay (one's) dues

To earn a given right or position through hard work, long-term experience, or suffering: She paid her dues in small-town theaters before being cast in a Broadway play.
See also: due, pay
References in periodicals archive ?
To help Daiwa, EMG streamlined its due diligence reports, summarizing information in succinct tables and condensing narrative to need-to-know information only.
13,399,000 class B5 Floating Rate Notes, Due February 2039 'A';
An amended return (or other written notice to the Service of additional liability not listed on the original return) filed after the due date (including extensions) is not "the return" as described in Sec.
In an effort to avoid unforeseen problems, investors are being forced to allocate thousands of dollars in reserves to conduct due diligence and sniff out these obstacles.
83-111, the IRS held that, if an overpayment of income tax for a tax year occurs on or before the due date of the first installment of estimated tax for the succeeding tax year, the overpayment is available for credit against any installment of estimated tax for such succeeding tax year and will be credited in accordance with the taxpayer's election.
A state whose laws provide protection, security and opportunities to individuals, property and businesses may exact a toll in the form of taxes to support the government, but not without due process of law.
265,000,000 class A-1 Floating Rate Notes Due 2047 'AAA';
In Fluor, the Service determined that the company owed interest on an underpayment for 1982 that was later satisfied by application of an FTC carryback from 1984, and that interest owed should accrue from the due date of the 1982 return through the due date of the 1984 return.
9 billion senior secured term loan due 2013 at 'BB-/RR2';
172(f), "specified liability losses" are the sum of three types of deductible losses: (1) product liability losses, (2) losses due to liabilities arising under Federal or state law and (3) losses due to liabilities arising out of torts.
Fitch's cash flow stress scenarios do not consider any non-participating manufacturers adjustments, (NPM adjustment) that may cause a state's tobacco settlement revenues to be reduced due to failure to enforce the Model Statute, designed to create an incentive for tobacco manufacturers to participate in the MSA.
All returns filed within six months of their original due dates are automatically deemed to be timely filed.
100,000,000 class A1-B second priority senior secured floating-rate notes due 2042 'AAA';
222,492,000 class A floating-rate notes due September 2047 'AAA';
480,000,000 class AAA Class A-1 First Priority Senior Floating-Rate Notes Due April 2047 'AAA';