duck out

duck out

(of some place ) Fig. to sneak out of some place. She ducked out of the theater during the intermission. When no one was looking, she ducked out.
See also: duck, out

duck out (of something)

Fig. to evade something; to escape doing something. Are you trying to duck out of your responsibility? Fred tried to duck out of going to the dance.
See also: duck, out

duck out (of somewhere)

to leave a place quickly and without being noticed The press was waiting for us in front of the hospital, so we ducked out a side door into the car.
Usage notes: often said about leaving before an event is finished: She ducked out of the dinner to watch the last quarter of the game.
Related vocabulary: slip away
See also: duck, out

duck out

Leave hurriedly or secretly; evade responsibility. For example, If I can I'll duck out of the office early, or He simply ducked out on his entire family. This slangy expression originated in the late 1800s simply as duck, out being added about 1930.
See also: duck, out

duck out

v.
1. To sneak out of some place: The shy student ducked out of the school dance early. When no one was looking, I ducked out.
2. To avoid or neglect some responsibility or obligation: I ducked out of mowing the lawn and headed to the beach. My kids were supposed to clean the garage this morning, but they ducked out by claiming they were too tired.
See also: duck, out
References in classic literature ?
of robbing an orchard, of stealing a duck out of a farmer's yard, and of picking Master Blifil's pocket of a ball.