drum

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Related to drummed: drummed out, drummed up

drum (something) into (someone's) head

To educate someone of something through intense and frequent repetition. The teacher tried drumming the material into their heads before the statewide exam, but he was still concerned they weren't getting it. You never listen to what I'm telling you! Do I have to drum it into your head, or what?
See also: drum, head

march to (the beat of) a different drum

To do something, act, or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to the beat of a different drum. Look, I respect the fact that you like to march to a different drum, but do you have to make a point of doing everything in a counter-cultural way?
See also: beat, different, drum, march

march to (the beat of) (one's) own drum

To do something, act, or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to the beat of his own drum. Look, I respect the fact that you like to march to your own drum, but do you have to make a point of doing everything in a counter-cultural way?
See also: beat, drum, march

pay with the roll of the drum

To avoid paying a debt. If you keep paying with the roll of the drum, you will soon owe me hundreds of dollars!
See also: drum, of, pay, roll

beat the drum for someone or something

 and bang the drum for someone or something
Fig. to promote or support someone or something. (As if one were beating a drum to get attention.) I spent a lot of time beating the drum for our plans for the future. The senator is only banging the drum for his special interests.
See also: beat, drum

drum on something

to tap, thump, or beat on something in rhythm. Who is drumming on the table? Please stop drumming on the wall.
See also: drum, on

drum someone out of something

 and drum someone out
Fig. to expel or send someone away from something, especially in a formal or public fashion. They drummed Bill out of the bridge club for having a bad attitude. The corps drums out a few cadets each year.
See also: drum, of, out

drum something into someone

 and drum something into someone's head; drum something in
Fig. to teach someone something intensely. Her mother had drummed good manners into her. She drummed in good manners day after day.
See also: drum

drum something out

to beat a rhythm, loudly and clearly, as if teaching it to someone. Drum the rhythm out before you try to sing this song. Drum out the rhythm first.
See also: drum, out

drum something up

to obtain something by attracting people's attention to one's need or cause. I shall try to drum up support for the party. You shall have to drum up new business by advertising. I need to do something to drum some business up.
See also: drum, up

*tight as a drum

 
1. stretched tight. (*Also: as ~.) Julia stretched the upholstery fabric over the seat of the chair until it was as tight as a drum. The skin on his scalp is tight as a drum.
2. sealed tight. (*Also: as ~.) Now that I've caulked all the windows, the house should be tight as a drum. Your butterfly died because the jar is as tight as a drum.
3. and *tight as Midas's fist very stingy. (*Also: as ~.) He won't contribute a cent. He's as tight as a drum. Old Mr. Robinson is tight as Midas's fist. Won't spend money on anything.
See also: drum, tight

beat the drum

to attract attention The president said he will beat the drum to build public support for his education program.
Usage notes: sometimes followed by for: Who is beating the drum for the parents' rights act?
See also: beat, drum

drum something into somebody

to teach something to someone by frequent repetition Firefighters rely on training that's drummed into them through repeated exercises.
See also: drum

drum somebody out of something

to force someone to leave a job or organization A lot of writers and directors were drummed out of the film business in the 1950s because they were suspected of being communists.
See also: drum, of, out

drum up something

to create interest in something The best way to drum up excitement for a book is to get people to talk about it.
See also: drum, up

bang/beat the drum

to speak eagerly about something that you support (often + for ) Once again she was banging the drum for pre-school nurseries. The opposition parties are always beating the environmental drum.
See also: bang, drum

beat into one's head

Also, knock or drum into one's head . Force one to learn something. For example, Hard as I try, I can't seem to beat the correct safe combination into my head, or He promised to drum the numbers into my head by morning, or Whether we liked it or not, the English department was determined to knock Shakespeare into our heads . Although beat implies violence, the first term, from the early 1500s, usually alludes more to a repeated striking of blows, that is, repetition or drilling; likewise with drum (alluding to drumbeats), which dates from the early 1800s.
See also: beat, head

beat the drum for

Praise, promote, publicize, as in He's always beating the drum for his division, which actually has done very well. This term transfers the literal striking of a drum for ceremonial or other purposes to touting the virtues of a person, group, or product. [Mid-1900s]
See also: beat, drum

drum out

Expel or dismiss publicly and in disgrace, as in They drummed him out of the club. This usage, which alludes to dismissal from a military service to the beat of a drum, began to be applied to civilian expulsions in the mid-1700s.
See also: drum, out

drum up

1. Bring about by persistent effort, as in I'm trying to drum up more customers, or We have to drum up support for this amendment. This expression alludes to making repeated drumbeats. [Mid-1800s]
2. Devise, invent, obtain, as in He hoped to drum up an alibi. [Mid-1800s]
See also: drum, up

tight as a drum

Taut or close-fitting; also, watertight. For example, That baby's eaten so much that the skin on his belly is tight as a drum, or You needn't worry about leaks; this tent is tight as a drum. Originally this expression alluded to the skin of a drumhead, which is tightly stretched, and in the mid-1800s was transferred to other kinds of tautness. Later, however, it sometimes referred to a drum-shaped container, such as an oil drum, which had to be well sealed to prevent leaks, and the expression then signified "watertight."
See also: drum, tight

drum up

v.
1. To bring something about by continuous, persistent effort: The advertising firm drummed up new business for us. The manager tried to drum interest up in the computer training classes.
2. To obtain or resourcefully put together something that one needs; come up with something: The witness drummed up an alibi during the trial. We drummed some volunteers up for the project.
See also: drum, up

beat the drum for someone/something

tv. to promote or support someone or something. I spent a lot of time beating the drum for our plans for the future.
See also: beat, drum
References in classic literature ?
Dunster drummed for a moment upon the table with his fingers.
Then he roused me up, and I took my turn of three hours; before the end of which it was broad day, and a very quiet morning, with a smooth, rolling sea that tossed the ship and made the blood run to and fro on the round-house floor, and a heavy rain that drummed upon the roof.
Addenbrooke raised his eyebrows over the card I found for him; then he drummed upon it with his finger-nail, and his embarrassment expressed itself in a puzzled smile.
She drummed nervously upon the tablecloth with her fingers.
Gobila's people drummed and yelled to every new moon, as of yore, but kept away from the station.
Rigaud, with a loud laugh, drummed his heels against the table, and chinked his money.
He gnawed his lip, drummed his fingers upon the table, and showed every other symptom of acute impatience.
In the impressive surroundings of Seaton Delaval Hall in Northumberland, Newcastle-based drumming group Drummed Up led a class to give people the chance to get musical to West African beats.