drug


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Related to drug: drug abuse, drugstore

drug of choice

1. An illicit substance one is addicted to or tends to prefer. I dabbled with a few different recreational drugs in college, but marijuana was my drug of choice.
2. The favored pharmaceutical treatment for a given medical condition or ailment. Lithium has long been the drug of choice for many physicians to treat depression and bipolar disorder.
3. By extension, any habit, activity, or vice that one is particularly fond of or dependent upon. A lot of people resort to drugs or alcohol to cope with their problems, but exercise has always been my drug of choice. Coffee became my drug of choice after working as a barista for three years during college.
See also: choice, drug, of

drugstore cowboy

1. A young man who loiters in public places, such as on street corners or outside of drugstores, especially in the attempt to impress or woo young women. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. I hate going through this area, there's always a few drugstore cowboys cat-calling me when I pass by.
2. A person who dresses and acts like a cowboy but who has never worked as one and has none of a cowboy's skills or experience. Originally a reference to extras in Hollywood western films (who would remain in costume off set), it later extended to anyone who wears cowboy clothing purely for the purposes of style or affectation. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. The senator accused his challenger of being a drugstore cowboy—a city slicker who had no idea what it meant to live or work in the rural countryside.
3. One who sells, steals, and/or gets high on prescription or over-the-counter medications. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. Police apprehended a drugstore cowboy who held up a local pharmacy and made off with loads of prescription medication.
See also: cowboy

drug deal

The exchange of money for drugs. I think I just watched a drug deal take place on our corner!
See also: deal, drug

drug on the market

Something that is not in great demand because it is abundantly available. Mobile phones are a drug on the market these days, which is why they're so affordable.
See also: drug, market, on

sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll

A phrase used to indicate a wild, hedonistic lifestyle. Being a touring musician is not as exciting as it seems—it's definitely not all sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll.
See also: and, rock, roll

do drugs

To use drugs recreationally. I really admire Jess for never submitting to the peer pressure of those around her to drink or do drugs.
See also: drug

drugged up to the eyeballs

Heavily influenced by drugs. I don't remember anything from after my surgery—I was drugged up to the eyeballs!
See also: drug, eyeball, up

kick the (something)

slang To overcome an addiction to something. It took gum, patches, and even hypnosis, but I've finally kicked the habit. Unfortunately, the physical nature of heroin addiction means that kicking the habit isn't as simple as just wanting to stop. After saying such horrible things to my parents, I decided it was finally time to kick the booze for good.
See also: kick

do drugs

 and do dope
to take illegal drugs; to use illegal drugs habitually. Sam doesn't do drugs, and he doesn't drink. Richard started doing dope when he was very young.
See also: drug

a drug on the market

 and a glut on the market
something that is on the market in great abundance. Right now, small computers are a drug on the market. Twenty years ago, small transistor radios were a glut on the market.
See also: drug, market, on

drug on the market

A commodity whose supply greatly exceeds the demand for it. For example, Now that asbestos is considered dangerous, asbestos tile is a drug on the market. The use of the noun drug in the sense of "something overabundant" (as opposed to a medicine or narcotic) dates from the mid-1600s, but the first record of the full expression, put as drug in the market, dates only from the 1830s.
See also: drug, market, on

drugged up to the eyeballs

If someone is drugged up to the eyeballs, they have taken a lot of drugs which have strongly affected them. He wasn't making much sense, lying in his hospital bed, drugged up to the eyeballs.
See also: drug, eyeball, up

a drug on the market

an unsaleable or valueless commodity.
Drug in the sense of ‘a commodity for which there is no demand’ is recorded from the mid 17th century, but it is not clear from the word's history whether it is the same word as the medicinal substance.
1998 Spectator Merchant banks are a drug on the market these days.
See also: drug, market, on

drugged up to the ˈeyeballs

have taken or been given a lot of drugs: She was drugged up to the eyeballs, but still in a lot of pain.
See also: drug, eyeball, up

kick the ˈhabit, ˈdrug, ˈbooze, etc.

stop doing something harmful that you have done for a long time: According to research, only one smoker in a hundred is able to kick the habit without some kind of help.
See also: kick

do drugs

and do dope
tv. to take drugs; to use drugs habitually. (Drugs and now general.) Is she still doing dope? Rocko doesn’t do drugs, and he doesn’t drink.
See also: drug

do the drug thing

tv. to be involved with drugs; to take drugs. Man, you gotta stop doing the drug thing.
See also: drug, thing

drug

1. in. to use drugs. (Drugs.) There is no way that she will stop drugging by herself.
2. and drug out mod. down; depressed. We are all drug out after that meeting.

drug out

verb
See drug
See also: drug, out

drug lord

n. a drug dealer high up in the distribution chain. The drug lords like Mr. Big seem never to get arrested.
See also: drug, lord

drugstore cowboy

n. a male who hangs around drugstores and other public places trying to impress women. You don’t see the old drugstore cowboys around this part of town anymore.
See also: cowboy

head drug

n. a drug that affects the mind rather than the body; a psychoactive drug. It’s these head drugs that get the kids into so much trouble.
See also: drug, head

drugstore cowboy

A derisive phrase for a fashionably dressed man who loitered around public places trying to pick up women. The phrase, which may have originated with movie cowboys who wore their costumes when they broke for lunch, brings to mind the fashion plate's inability to ride anything more challenging than a drugstore counter stool.
See also: cowboy
References in periodicals archive ?
Medicare already has a feeble track record in other areas of healthcare delivery, so the prospect of giving Medicare new powers to set drug prices is not reassuring.
Yet, despite the leading language, fully 60 percent of all of those questioned also agreed that negotiations "will lead to government price controls on prescription drugs.
Monitoring the proper use of the medications: Because of their coordinated patient-care model, specialty pharmacies can work directly with the physician to ensure the drug is appropriate for treatment and the medication is prescribed at the proper dosage level.
Timing the delivery of medications to minimize waste: By enabling the careful coordination of specialty drug delivery, which often requires strict storage conditions, specialty pharmacies prevent plan sponsors from paying for medications that, when improperly stored, become unsafe to use.
We searched drug information Web sites produced under the auspices of the federal government (e.
They bury their heads in the sand and don't even entertain the thought of a faculty drug testing program," says Hovland.
Taken together, data obtained from the Taiwan Surveillance of Drug Resistance in Tuberculosis and those reported previously show that rates of combined resistance to any drugs and multiple drugs has declined in Taiwan.
That way, they get all of the drug in their system at one time, and the body responds very differently.
And, as writer Greg Critser argues in this fascinating, often funny but ultimately flawed book, the drug industry's brilliant marketing techniques also helped turn Americans into a nation of pill poppers, or "Generation Rx.
These tests follow the protocol in the European Technical Guidance Document to further investigate the risk posed by the drug to the environment.
Last January a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory panel considered a proposal to put Mevacor within easier reach.
Interestingly, Hoffman-LaRoche is now moving back to the original Invirase formulation of saquinavir (with a new 500-mg tablet) because it is better tolerated than the Fortovase version when the drug is combined with ritonavir.
A landmark study called HIVNET 012, which has been under way in Uganda since 1997, has determined that, for preventing mother-to-child transmission, nevirapine is superior to the drug zidovudine, which was previously given to mothers late in pregnancy and to infants ill their first week of life.
The clinical research (IND) phase--representing the time from beginning of human trials to the new drug application (NDA) submission that seeks permission to market the drug--is by far the longest portion of the drug development cycle and can last from 2 to 10 years.