drown

(redirected from drowned)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

drown in self-pity

To be entirely consumed by sorrow, self-deprecation, or other negative emotions to the point of self-indulgence and/or paralysis. It's hard to help someone who would rather drown in self-pity than find a solution to their problems.
See also: drown

a drowning man will clutch at a straw

Someone who is desperate will try to use anything for help, even if it is really no help at all. Facing the possibility that his marriage might be over, John began visiting psychics to help him decide what to do. A drowning man will clutch at a straw.
See also: clutch, drown, man, straw, will

drown (one's) troubles

To attempt to forget one's troubles through the consumption of something, typically alcohol (to which the phrase originally referred). It's not healthy to just drown your troubles every time a girl breaks up with you. Quit drinking and try to face reality. Whenever I have a hard week at work, I like to spend Friday night drowning my troubles in pizza and ice cream.
See also: drown, trouble

drown in (something)

1. Literally, to die from asphyxiation while submerged in a liquid. No one is drowning in the ocean today—not on this lifeguard's watch!
2. To cause oneself, someone, or something die from asphyxiation while submerged in a liquid. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "drown" and "in." Virginia Woolf's writing career came to an end in 1941 when she drowned herself in the River Ouse.
3. To overwhelm someone with an abundance of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "drown" and "in." I don't mean to drown you in paperwork, but I do need all of these documents filed today.
4. To be completely overwhelmed by the abundance of something. I need one of those interns to help me file today because I'm totally drowning in paperwork.
See also: drown

drown out

1. To force someone out of one's home, often due to flooding. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drown" and "out." Unfortunately, that hurricane drowned us out, and we've been staying with relatives ever since.
2. To use or create a louder noise to make a different, often unpleasant, noise less audible. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drown" and "out." I immediately turned up the TV in an attempt to drown out my brother's tuba practice.
See also: drown, out

look like a drowned rat

To be soaking wet, especially due to heavy rain. You poor thing, you look like a drowned rat! The kids came home looking like a bunch of drowned rats.
See also: drown, like, look, rat

drown (one's) sorrow(s)

To attempt to forget one's troubles through the consumption of something, typically alcohol (to which the phrase originally referred). It's not healthy to just drown your sorrows every time a girl breaks up with you. Quit drinking and try to face reality. Whenever I have a hard week at work, I like to spend Friday night drowning my sorrow in pizza and ice cream.
See also: drown

drown the shamrock

To drink alcohol on St. Patrick's Day. Make sure you wear green when we go to drown the shamrock tomorrow night.
See also: drown

like a drowned rat

Soaking wet (and usually dirty and unkempt as well). She came in from the storm looking like a drowned rat. The poor little guy stood shivering on the beach like a drowned rat.
See also: drown, like, rat

drown in something

 
1. . Lit. to be asphyxiated in some liquid. Wouldn't you hate to drown in that nasty, smelly water? lam not choosy about what I don't want to drown in.
2. Fig. to experience an overabundance of something. We are just drowning in cabbage this year. Our garden is full of it. They were drowning in bills, not money to pay them with.
See also: drown

drown one's troubles

 and drown one's sorrows
Fig. to try to forget one's problems by drinking a lot of alcohol. Bill is in the bar, drowning his troubles. Jane is at home, drowning her sorrows.
See also: drown, trouble

drown someone in something

Fig. to inundate someone with something. (See also drown in something.) I will drown you in money and fine clothes. Mike drowned the nightclub singer in fancy jewels and furs.
See also: drown

drown (someone or an animal) in something

to cause someone or an animal to die of asphyxiation in a liquid. He accidentally drowned the cat in the bathtub. She drowned herself in the lake.
See also: drown

drown someone (or an animal) out

[for a flood] to drive someone or an animal away from home. The high waters almost drowned the farmers out last year. The water drowned out the fields.
See also: drown, out

drown someone or something out

[for a sound] to be so loud that someone or something cannot be heard. The noise of the passing train drowned out our conversation. The train drowned us out.
See also: drown, out

A drowning man will clutch at a straw.

Prov. When you are desperate, you will look for anything that might help you, even if it cannot help you very much. Scott thinks this faith healer will cure his baldness. A drowning man will clutch at a straw.
See also: clutch, drown, man, straw, will

If you're born to be hanged, then you'll never be drowned.

Prov. If you escape one disaster, it must be because you are destined for a different kind of disaster. (Sometimes used to warn someone who has escaped drowning against gloating over good luck.) When their ship was trapped in a terrible storm, Ellen told her husband that she feared they would die. "Don't worry," he replied with a yawn, "if you're born to be hanged, then you'll never be drowned."
See also: born, drown, if, never

drown one's sorrows

Drink liquor to escape one's unhappiness. For example, After the divorce, she took to drowning her sorrows at the local bar. The notion of drowning in drink dates from the late 1300s.
See also: drown, sorrow

drown out

Overwhelm with a louder sound, as in Their cries were drowned out by the passing train. [Early 1600s]
See also: drown, out

like a drowned rat

Also, wet as a drowned rat. Soaking wet and utterly bedraggled, as in When she came in out of the rain she looked like a drowned rat. This simile appeared in Latin nearly 2,000 years ago, and in English about the year 1500.
See also: drown, like, rat

look like a drowned rat

If someone looks like a drowned rat, they are very wet, usually because they have been caught in heavy rain. I had no umbrella with me so by the time I got home, I looked like a drowned rat.
See also: drown, like, look, rat

drown your sorrows

If someone drowns their sorrows, they drink a lot of alcohol in order to forget something sad that has happened to them. He was in the pub drowning his sorrows after the break-up of his relationship.
See also: drown, sorrow

drown your sorrows

forget your problems by getting drunk.
See also: drown, sorrow

like a drowned rat

extremely wet and bedraggled.
See also: drown, like, rat

drown the shamrock

drink, or go drinking on St Patrick's day.
The shamrock with its three-lobed leaves was said to have been used by St Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, to illustrate the doctrine of the Trinity. It is now used as the national emblem of Ireland.
See also: drown

drown your ˈsorrows

(informal, often humorous) try to forget your problems or a disappointment by drinking alcohol: Whenever his team lost a match he could be found in the pub afterwards drowning his sorrows.
See also: drown, sorrow

like a drowned ˈrat

(informal) very wet: She came in from the storm looking like a drowned rat.
See also: drown, like, rat

drown out

v.
To muffle or mask some sound with a louder sound: I turned up my TV in order to drown out the noise coming from next door. The protesters drowned the speaker out.
See also: drown, out

drown (one's) sorrow

/sorrows
To try to forget one's troubles by drinking alcohol.
See also: drown, sorrow
References in periodicals archive ?
March 13, 2016: Three swimming coaches and two school officials were made liable for the death of a five-year-old Belgian boy who drowned while swimming in a pool for adults.
On the same day, Piolo Pilapil, 16, drowned in Barangay Bagong Silang in Calatagan, Batangas.
To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time a child has drowned aboard one of our ships," Carnival spokeswoman Joyce Oliva said.
In the second incident, a 54-year-old man from Sofia, who was on vacation with his family, drowned at the Arkutino beach near the town of Primorsko.
The six-year-old drowned at a pool in Sanad while she was with her mother and around 40 female relatives.
Meanwhile, body of another person was recovered, who had drowned two days before.
Even the facts of what happened to the two women before their bodies appeared in a nullah no one had drowned in till now will ever be known.
They conducted interviews with 88 children families of children, who had drowned between 2003 and 2005, and also with the families of 213 control children, who were the same age and sex and lived in the same county as those who had drowned.
AN EGYPTIAN woman yesterday drowned while swimming at sea near the Old Port of Limassol.
Thanks to the campaign, only two people drowned during the first half of this year," said Al-Ghamdi, citing statistics from the past.
In this study, all the drowning cases were included, except those who were drowned by boat capsize.
Virtual autopsies with multidetector computed tomography could aid forensics teams in determining whether a person has drowned, according to a study in the June issue of Radiology.
They are the memories of Michael, a 21-year-old who drowned in a sailing accident well before Emily was born, setting her on the search for Michael's family; and her father, who is firm in his religious beliefs, coming to grips with the possibility of reincarnation.
TARZANA -- A 78-year-old man drowned Sunday after he went into a backyard pool intending to stay in the shallow end, and relatives found him in the deep end, authorities said.
The Drowned Violin: An Alan Nearing Mystery by Mel Malton is the fast-paced and fun mystery story that begins with finding of a violin in a local river by eleven year old Alan Nearing and his friends.