draw on


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draw on someone or something

 and draw upon someone or something
to use someone or something in some beneficial way; to extract from a resource, reserve, etc. I may have to draw on your advice in order to complete this project. If there is some way you can draw on me to your advantage, let me know. By the end of the contest I had drawn upon all the energy I had.
See also: draw, on

draw on something

to get ideas or facts from something The second half of the book draws on new discoveries in the field of microbiology.
See also: draw, on

draw on

1. Approach, as in As evening draws on, we'll make our way back to the house. [First half of 1500s]
2. Put on a piece of clothing, as in She drew on her gloves. [Early 1700s]
3. Also, draw upon. Make use of something or someone. For example, This dictionary draws on many different sources, or The chairman was good at drawing upon the various members for their expertise. [Mid-1600s]
See also: draw, on

draw on

v.
1. To put lines, pictures, or some other markings on some surface, using a pen, pencil, or other marking implement: The kids are drawing clowns on the the walls! In my art class we drew on big pieces of paper.
2. To use something as a resource: If I run out of cash, I'll have to draw on my savings account. I drew on my old scout training to make that fire.
3. To approach: The lost campers became more worried as nighttime drew on.
4. To pass gradually: The storm gradually lessened as the night drew on.
See also: draw, on