drank


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drink with the flies

To drink alone. Primarily heard in Australia. Come on, meet up with me at the bar! As it is, I'm just drinking with the flies, and it's depressing. Don't leave me here to drink with the flies—stay a little longer!
See also: drink, flies

(do something) to excess

To do or indulge in something too much. I started to lose weight once I stopped regularly eating to excess. I'll go to the pub with you guys, but I'm not drinking to excess tonight—I have to be up early tomorrow.
See also: excess

drink down

To drink all of something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drink" and "down." This smoothie is gross—I really can't drink it down.
See also: down, drink

drink in

To absorb and enjoy something thoroughly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drink" and "in." Let's stop for a moment and drink in this fresh mountain air. I'm glad I was able to drink in the excitement and joy of our wedding day before it was all over.
See also: drink

drink like a fish

To frequently drink a lot of alcohol. I'm not surprised to hear that Karl got drunk again last night—that guy drinks like a fish!
See also: drink, fish, like

drink to excess

To drink alcohol to the point of intoxication. This is an important event for me, honey, so please don't drink to excess and make a fool of yourself.
See also: drink, excess

drink (oneself) silly

To drink alcohol in large quantities. Of course you don't remember last night at the bar—you drank yourself silly!
See also: drink, silly

drink like a fish

Fig. to drink alcohol excessively; to be in the habit of drinking alcohol excessively. Jeff really drank like a fish at the party on Saturday. I worry about Nancy; she drinks like a fish.
See also: drink, fish, like

drink something down

to drink something; to consume all of something by drinking it. Here, drink this down, and see if it makes you feel better. Drink down this medicine.
See also: down, drink

drink something in

Fig. to absorb something; to take in information, sights, a story, etc. Terry and Amy drove up to the top of the hill to drink the sights in. They drank in the beautiful view.
See also: drink

drink to excess

Euph. to drink too much alcohol; to drink alcohol continually. Mr. Franklin drinks to excess. Some people drink to excess only at parties.
See also: drink, excess

drink like a fish

Consume large amounts of alcoholic beverages, as in He always drinks like a fish at holiday dinners. The expression, first recorded in the mid-1600s, alludes to the way fish obtain oxygen, which causes them to be open-mouthed and appear to be constantly drinking.
See also: drink, fish, like

drink like a fish

INFORMAL
If someone drinks like a fish, they regularly drink a lot of alcohol. When I was younger I could drink like a fish and eat like a pig. The father was not too bad but the mother drank like a fish. Note: People used to believe that fish drank constantly because they breathe through open mouths.
See also: drink, fish, like

drink like a fish

drink excessive amounts of alcohol, especially habitually.
See also: drink, fish, like

drink with the flies

drink alone. Australian & New Zealand informal
1963 D. Whitington Mile Pegs ‘Have a drink?’ the larrikin invited. ‘Or do you prefer drinking with the flies?’
See also: drink, flies

drink like a ˈfish

(informal) regularly drink too much alcohol: Her husband drinks like a fish.
See also: drink, fish, like

drink in

v.
To take something in eagerly through the senses or the mind: The campers drank in the view of the sunset over the mountain lake. The shoreline was so beautiful that I stopped for a while to drink it in.
See also: drink
References in periodicals archive ?
Charlie Wilson's district returned him to office by a two-to-one margin after he revealed he drank excessively.
Did you drink or have you for eleven years drank intoxicating liquor of any shape?
I can't recollect what she drank, I did not consider it my business to see what the lady drank".
Some had undoubtedly become familiar with the physical features that characterized individuals with FAS, others probably inferred a diagnosis from the fact that the child's mother drank heavily.
103] In many of the televised news reports of the legal steps that led to his execution, reporters referred to his counsel's claim that he had lacked competent psychiatric help at the time of trial, that his mental disorders had not been considered, and that "his mother drank heavily while pregnant and his father beat him.
The Harvard Nurses' Health Study, the major study of the connection between drinking and mortality among women, found that about three-quarters of all subjects had at least one such risk factor and were likely to live longer if they drank moderately.
The group's study found that men who drank two to four drinks daily had the lowest mortality rate.
While the runner also drank carbonated mineral water and fresh fruit juice - which are known to increase the risk of dental erosion, for the past year he had been drinking sports drinks regularly after training sessions.
His bosses, cohorts and customers all drank, and he did, too.
Legislators drank while in session; communion wine was part of Protestant services; the tavern was a family-oriented gathering place; and tavern keepers were highly respected members of the community.
Such findings, which began appearing in medical journals by the 1980s, presented public health officials with a dilemma: How was it possible to tell children drinking was bad but that people who drank lived longer?
One French study showed that while cirrhosis increased significantly in men who drank four to five drinks a day, the same increase was shown in women who drank only two to three drinks.
A Harvard Medical School study released last week found that women who drink two or three cups of coffee a day had a 66 percent decreased risk of committing suicide compared to those who never drank the beverage.