drag down


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drag down

v.
1. To pull something or someone from a higher to a lower position: She dragged down the boxes from the attic. Help me drag the camping gear down the hill.
2. To lower the quality, character, or value of something or someone: His disruptions are dragging down the performance of the other students. Recent events have dragged prices down.
3. Slang To exhaust, discourage, or depress someone: All this work is really dragging me down. The lowered salaries have dragged down morale.
See also: down, drag
References in periodicals archive ?
The remarks were made at a press conference, which was hurriedly arranged one day after Economy and Finance Minister Mr Kang Bong-kyun said Daewoo has to accelerate selling off assets to resolve its cash shortage or it could drag down the entire Korean economy.
If such feelings attain the status of clinical depression, they literally drag down one's chances of living out the year after weathering a heart attack, a new study finds.
If a solution is not found soon, state and local funding of long-term projects like road building and maintenance could be put off and this could drag down the economy in 10 to 20 years, the forecast said.
The retailer believes that costs for gasoline, utilities, and interest rates will drag down their second-quarter earnings.
Nevertheless, economists generally said Tuesday that they expect the trade deficit to drag down overall economic growth.
This credit check can also drag down the unsuspecting consumer's credit score.
When a single hedge fund can owe $100 billion gambling with some $3 billion and drag down other institutions, nothing is reliable.
The resulting redundancies and inefficiencies drag down operating margins and stock prices.