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baker's half dozen

Half of a "baker's dozen" (13 rather than 12), thus, 7 rather than 6. The term "baker's dozen" to mean 13 originates from an 11th-century practice in which bakers would include an extra loaf of bread in a dozen so as to avoid facing penalties for selling underweight bread. The seven deadly sins are a baker's half dozen of things one should avoid in order to live a moral life.
See also: dozen, half

banker's dozen

One less than a dozen, i.e., 11. A play on "a baker's dozen" (13 rather than 12), it refers to lending in which interest is deducted at the time of the loan, therefore yielding less than what the loan actually stipulated. A soccer team has a banker's dozen players on the field at any given time.
See also: dozen

cheaper by the dozen

1. Costing less money if purchased in large quantities (not necessarily a dozen). Avocados are quite expensive at most supermarkets, but one down the street has a good deal for a bag of 12—cheaper by the dozen, I suppose!
2. Requiring less effort or accomplished more efficiently if handled by a larger group of people. This will be cheaper by the dozen if we all help, so let's pitch in and get this cleaned up!
See also: dozen

decimal dozen

Ten. Refers to a packaging design for a carton of ten wine bottles arranged in two rows of five. Primarily heard in Australia, New Zealand. Would you go down to the bottle shop and pick up a decimal dozen of wine for the party tonight?
See also: dozen

six in one, (and) half a dozen in the other

The difference between these two options is negligible, irrelevant, or unimportant; either option is fine or will work as well as the other. Well, we could take the freeway to your mother's house, or we could cut through the city. It takes about the same amount of time, so it's six in one, and half a dozen in the other. John: "Would you rather have pepperoni or sausage on your pizza?" Bob: "Eh, six in one, half a dozen in the other."
See also: dozen, half, other, six

ten to the dozen

Very rapidly, hurriedly, and/or energetically. My aunt can get talking ten to the dozen if you get her on a topic she's passionate about. Samson came running ten to the dozen when he heard his son crying out to him from the back garden.
See also: dozen, ten

talk twenty to the dozen

To talk (to someone) very rapidly, hurriedly, and/or energetically. My aunt can get talking twenty to the dozen if you get her on a topic she's passionate about.
See also: dozen, talk, twenty

a baker's dozen

Thirteen; one more than a usual dozen (12). When Jacob went to the bakery to buy doughnuts for the office, he made sure to get a baker's dozen so he could sneak one to eat on the way to work.
See also: dozen

dime a dozen

Ubiquitous; so abundant or common as to hold little or no value. In Los Angeles, waiters trying to become famous actors are a dime a dozen. That bird might be a rare sight where you come from, but around here they're a dime a dozen.
See also: dime, dozen

a baker's dozen

thirteen. (Bakers often added an extra item to an order for a dozen.) We ended up with a baker's dozen each of socks and undershirts on our shopping trip.
See also: dozen

by the dozen

in groups of 12. (Compare this with by the dozens.) Eggs are normally sold by the dozen.
See also: dozen

by the dozens

Fig. many; by some fairly large, indefinite number. (Similar to but implying less than hundreds. Compare this with by the dozen.) Just then people began showing up by the dozens. I baked cookies and pies by the dozens for the charity bake sale.
See also: dozen

daily dozen

Fig. physical exercises done every day. My brother always feels better after his daily dozen. She would rather do a daily dozen than go on a diet.
See also: daily, dozen

(a) dime a dozen

Fig. abundant; cheap and common. People who can write good books are not a dime a dozen. Romantic movies are a dime a dozen.
See also: dime, dozen

It's six of one, half a dozen of another.

Cliché Two options are equivalent. To get downtown, we can either take the highway or the side streets. It's six of one, half a dozen of another, since both routes take the same amount of time. Jill: Would you rather peel the carrots or wash the lettuce? Jane: It's six of one, half a dozen of the other.
See also: another, dozen, half, of, six

nineteen to the dozen

Prov. very rapidly or energetically. Whenever I get together with my cousins, we always gossip away nineteen to the dozen. While Alan got the other ingredients, Jane was chopping up potatoes nineteen to the dozen.
See also: dozen

six of one and half a dozen of the other

Fig. about the same one way or another. It doesn't matter to me which way you do it. It's six of one and half a dozen of the other. What difference does it make? They're both the samesix of one and half a dozen of the other.
See also: and, dozen, half, of, one, other, six

a dime a dozen

commonly available Remember, editors are a dime a dozen, so if she causes trouble, fire her.
See also: dime, dozen

by the dozen

in large numbers He would sit all day in the dark watching videos by the dozen.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of by the dozen (in groups of twelve)
See also: dozen

half a dozen

a few of something I've got half a dozen fishing poles that I never use.
Usage notes: used when the exact number is not important
See also: dozen, half

six of one, (and) half a dozen of the other

two things are almost the same or equal I also compared the two stereos, and in most respects it's six of one, half a dozen of the other.
Etymology: based on the idea that half a dozen ( half of 12) is equal to six
See also: dozen, half, of, other, six

a baker's dozen

  (old-fashioned)
thirteen The judges selected a baker's dozen of promising entries from the hundreds they received.
See also: dozen

be a dime a dozen

  (American & Australian informal)
to be common and not have much value Romantic novels like these are a dime a dozen.
See also: dime, dozen

by the dozen

if something is being produced by the dozen, large numbers of that thing are being produced The government is producing new policies by the dozen.
See also: dozen

nineteen/ten to the dozen

  (British & Australian informal)
if someone is talking nineteen to the dozen, they are talking very fast, without stopping Gaby was chatting away nineteen to the dozen behind me and I couldn't concentrate.
See also: dozen

six of one and half a dozen of the other

if you say that a bad situation is six of one and half a dozen of the other, you mean that two people or groups are equally responsible Harriet's always accusing Donald of starting arguments, but if you ask me, it's six of one and half a dozen of the other.
See also: and, dozen, half, of, one, other, six

baker's dozen

Thirteen, as in The new bagel store always gives you a baker's dozen. The origins of this term are disputed. One theory is that in times when bread was sold by weight, bakers who short-weighted their customers were heavily fined, and for safety's sake they would sell thirteen loaves for the price of twelve. Another theory is that dealers purchasing bread from bakers were allowed by law to receive thirteen loaves for the price of twelve, the thirteenth representing their cut of profit. [Late 1500s]
See also: dozen

by the dozen

Also, by the hundred or thousand . According to a definite quantity, as in She's buying tapes by the dozen. This usage is generally employed for some kind of rate. A 1950 film about efficiency expert Frank Gilbreth and his family was entitled Cheaper by the Dozen. [c. 1300]
See also: dozen

daily dozen

Physical exercise, as in Helen walks two miles every morning-that's her daily dozen. This term originally referred to a set of twelve specific calisthenic exercises to be performed every day. They were devised by a famous Yale University football coach, Walter Camp (1859-1925), and came into general use in the early 1900s. Despite the physical fitness craze of the late 1900s, these exercises and their name are no longer taken literally, but the term survives in a very general way.
See also: daily, dozen

dime a dozen

So plentiful as to be valueless. For example, Don't bother to buy one of these-they're a dime a dozen. The dime was declared the American ten-cent coin in 1786 by the Continental Congress. [First half of 1900s]
See also: dime, dozen

six of one, half a dozen of the other

The two alternatives are the same, as in Either Route 2 or Long Avenue will get you there-it's six of one, half a dozen of the other . This term simply equates two different ways of saying "six." [First half of 1800s]
See also: dozen, half, of, other, six

daily dozen

n. a short set of daily exercises. I need to do my daily dozen before breakfast.
See also: daily, dozen

the (dirty) dozens

n. a game of trading insulting remarks about relatives. (Originally black.) Freddy is out giving the dozens to Marty.
See also: dirty, dozen

the dozens

verb
See also: dozen

long dozen

n. thirteen; a baker’s dozen. They used to give you a long dozen in that bakery.
See also: dozen, long

play the dozens

and shoot the dozens
tv. to trade insulting remarks concerning relatives with another person. (see also (dirty) dozens.) They’re out playing the dozens. There’s a bunch of kids out there messing around shooting the dozens.
See also: dozen, play

shoot the dozens

verb
See also: dozen, shoot

a dime a dozen

Overly abundant; commonplace.
See also: dime, dozen