down-at-the-heel


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down-at-the-heel

Having a worn-out, shabby, or cheap appearance, as due to poverty or overuse. A lot of so-called hipsters try to affect a down-at-the-heel look by wearing second-hand clothing. John has been looking increasingly down-at-the-heel ever since he lost his job last year.
References in periodicals archive ?
America is being transformed from an industrial colossus to a tired, down-at-the-heels, post-industrial society.
Thus the origin of the famous "skid road" (not row," as some urbanites term their down-at-the-heels areas).
Under his watch, the city transformed from a down-at-the-heels urban center with a dwindling downtown to an arts and culture hub.
With Teddy, it was like being stuck next to a lonely person on a plane, or in his down-at-the-heels case it would be a bus, and having to listen to story after story about his life in show business.
The new building also functions as an aspirational object in a down-at-the-heels part of town: It is intended to represent the possibility of a richer (intellectually or otherwise) life to the adults and children who will use it every day.
Trains rumble past across the street, and the area of town has at times leaned toward a down-at-the-heels label.
Yuzhno-Sakalinsk, the dusty, down-at-the-heels capital of Sakhalin, is like many provincial Russian burgs, punctuated at its center by a pigeon-desecrated statue of Lenin.
she said, interrupting a cozy chat with her client when a man bustled in from the street with an armload of down-at-the-heels shoes in need of fixing.
A Window in Novorusiysk" (1988), a scathing protest, offers convergent impressions of a downtrodden city, attempting to hold its civic head high with the memory of an ill-conceived military assault, and the image of a poor, down-at-the-heels widow who stalks the pier where tourists arrive, not to elicit their pity but to cause embarrassment at her condition.
In May of 1995, at the nadir of economic collapse sparked by peso devaluation, residents of a down-at-the-heels Monterey railyard colony stopped a freight train and broke open boxcars filled with imported corn.
Examining some of his most noteworthy roles--a blond, brooding Hamlet; stalwart King Henry V; seething, Gypsy-like Heathcliff in "Wuthering Heights"; seedy, down-at-the-heels Archie Rice in "The Entertainer"; arrogant Roman aristocrat in "Spartacus"; Nazi war criminal in "Marathon Man"; malevolent, crookbacked Richard III; and Othello, played in blackface without being the least bit demeaning--confirms his amazing grasp on technique, but one wonders what his detractors were watching when they claimed he lacked feeling.
This ritual observance is named in honor of a down-at-the-heels retired New York City policeman, a recovering alcoholic, who is the hero of a series of engaging detective novels by Lawrence Block.
Of the nation's embarrassing down-at-the-heels infrastructure -- roads, airports, harbors -- Wyden says, "You can't have a big-league quality of life and big-league economic growth with little league infrastructure.
His predilection for down-at-the-heels, quotidian materials suggests the influence of arte povera, and a preference for tones of pale yellow and dusty black allows his installations to appear as at once sculptures and sketches, objects and plans.
The route passes through the down-at-the-heels border town of Douglas, Ariz.