double cross


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double cross

1. noun An act of duplicitous betrayal or swindling, especially of a friend, ally, or colleague. Originally a sporting term in which a "cross" referred to an event that had been fixed by the participants to fail; a "double cross" happened when one participant secretly backed out of that arrangement and went on to win the event. Double crosses happen all the time in politics, with politicians making promises to each other behind closed doors and reneging upon them down the road. Jonathan's double cross ended up costing our company millions of dollars of wasted research and development.
2. verb To betray or cheat someone in a duplicitous manner, especially by going back on a previously agreed upon arrangement. We've been double-crossed, fellas, so keep your eyes open for the cops. John and I spent years developing the product together, but he double-crossed me once it was finished and got a patent for it under his name alone.
See also: cross, double

double cross

A deliberate betrayal; violation of a promise or obligation, as in They had planned a double cross, intending to keep all of the money for themselves. This usage broadens the term's earlier sense in sports gambling, where it alluded to the duplicity of a contestant who breaks his word after illicitly promising to lose. Both usages gave rise to the verb double-cross. [Late 1800s]
See also: cross, double

double cross

1. tv. to betray someone. (Originally a more complicated switching of sides in a conspiracy wherein the double-crosser sides with the victim of the conspiracy—against the original conspirator.) Don’t even think about double crossing me!
2. n. a betrayal. (See comments with sense 1) It’s one double cross Frank is sorry about.
See also: cross, double
References in periodicals archive ?
Macintyre does not ignore the risks involved in Operation Fortitude-, indeed, he highlights them because they give Double Cross its narrative tension.
Double Cross is an engaging and well-written contribution to the field of narrative, popular history.
Double Cross is Macintyre's third book on spying and intelligence operations in the Second World War.
Masterman, The Double Cross System in the War 1939-1945 (1972); John C.
11) The writing on the back of the book claims, "[Operation Fortitude] has never before been told from the perspective of the key individuals in the Double Cross system, until now.
THE SPIES WHO FOOLED Hitler (BBC Timewatch 1999) (explaining the Double Cross system, including the process of "turning" captured German agents).
Macintyre uses the term "chicken feed" throughout Double Cross, but does not indicate whether the term is his own or is derived from one of the primary sources.
I wanted to write a play about nationalism and in a real sense Double Cross derives from the whole debate about national identity, which Field Day did so much to promote in the seventies and eighties.
The title, Double Cross, catches the intricate concerns of the play: the phrase means 'a betrayal of the other party in a dishonest transaction', and it also alludes to the author's interest in doubleness or doubling.
Double Cross is a play about history, providing a contemporary audience with the means for 'disentangling the contradictions of the present by placing them at a distance', (11) to borrow Fintan O'Toole's phrase.
Of the relation between Double Cross and Wilde's Earnest, Roche says:
Of course, the tone and texture of Wilde's play are totally different from those of Double Cross.
But Double Cross is the negative to Wilde's play, a further twist of already 'twisted' values.
Double Cross Luxury Vodka can be found in multiple restaurant, lounge, club, bar and retail locations throughout the greater New York and New Jersey markets.
Double Cross Luxury Vodka was introduced into the metropolitan NJ and NY market in September 2008.