dole

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be on the dole

To be or begin receiving assistance, financial or otherwise, from publicly or privately funded agencies (usually run by the government) due to a certain level of hardship, poverty, or need. It was really disheartening having to be on the dole these past six months, but it was the only thing that kept our family afloat after I lost my job. Some people are very critical of those who have been on the dole for extended periods of time.
See also: dole, on

go on the dole

To begin receiving assistance, financial or otherwise, from publicly or privately funded agencies (usually run by the government) due to a certain level of hardship, poverty, or need. It was really disheartening having to go on the dole these past six months, but it was the only thing that kept our family afloat after I lost my job. Some people are very critical of those who have gone on the dole for extended periods of time.
See also: dole, on

dole something out

(to someone ) to distribute something to someone. The cook doled the oatmeal out to each camper who held out a bowl. Please dole out the candy bars, one to a customer. She doled it out fairly.
See also: dole, out

on the dole

receiving welfare money. I spent six months on the dole, and believe me, it's no picnic.
See also: dole, on

on relief

Also, on welfare; on the dole. Receiving public financial assistance, as in Half the people in this town are on relief, or Don hated the idea of going on welfare. The first two terms originated in the United States in the 1930s, when government assistance of this kind was first instituted. On the dole, used mainly in Britain but occasionally in America, dates from the 1920s, although the use of dole for a charitable gift dates from about 1200.
See also: on, relief

dole out

v.
To distribute something: The government doles out cheese to the needy. The teacher doled pencils out to the students.
See also: dole, out

on the dole

Receiving regular relief payments from or as if from the government.
See also: dole, on

on relief

Receiving public assistance because of need or poverty.
See also: on, relief
References in periodicals archive ?
Stockman and Baker grumbled, and Dole never made it into the inner circles of the Reagan White House.
Feminists who have worked with Elizabeth Dole say she has always pushed for women's issues, and yet from the beginning of her service in the White House, her approach was remarkably conciliatory.
Pat,' said Elizabeth Dole, "guess what I've just done.
Later that year, Reuss received another invigorating call from Dole.
From the beginning Dole was obsessed with publicity.
The industry fought the law--it held out the prospect of regular, discouraging travel bulletins--and Dole called it "rigid, unilateral,' and "counterproductive to international cooperation.
This view of Dole clashes somewhat with her persona at the FTC--the hardworking, substantive commissioner signing sober opinions--but then Dole's role had changed as well.
Heckler (intractable) could be counted on as window dressing for the administration's policies on women, and inevitably the job fell to Dole (effusive).
So Dole made the rounds of the women's magazines and rallied women as she had consumers and businessmen before that.
Then the Democrats nominated Geraldine Ferraro, and Dole became even more important.
Referring to one of Clinton's proposals, the capital gains tax cut for home sellers, Dole addressed Clinton directly:
In the last several days, Dole has developed as a campaign theme the purported appropriation of Republican ideas by Clinton.
I've got this great big `Me, too' sign I carry around with me,'' said a shirt-sleeved Dole.
Pete Wilson introduced Dole and talked about the Republican ticket, the crowd in the sunny horse arenas of the Orange County fairgrounds began chanting:
Photo: Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole greets su pporters at the Orange County Fairgrounds.