pay dividends

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Related to dividend: Dividend yield

pay dividends

to produce good results or advantages My Spanish lessons have finally begun to pay dividends, and I can carry on a simple conversation!
Usage notes: often used to refer to something you do now that will benefit you in the future: All your work will pay dividends – you'll see.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of pay a dividend (to pay someone who owns shares in a company a part of a company's profit)
See also: pay

pay dividends

if something you do pays dividends, it causes good results at a time in the future
Usage notes: In the financial world a dividend is part of the profit of a company that is paid to the people who own shares in it.
Plenty of practice early in the season will pay dividends later on.
See also: pay
References in periodicals archive ?
The rationale is that under current law, VRP investors which have the virtual assurance of preserving capital and maintaining a under current law, VRP investors, set level of dividend cash flow, will unfairly receive the economic benefit of equity from an investment that has "non-stock" characteristics.
Certain taxpayers in the insurance industry took the position that the (1) portions of prior CRTC [section]24410 that related to commercial domicile and limited the deduction to insurance company dividends paid from California-source income were severable from the statute; and (2) remaining portions of pre-AB 263 CRTC [section]24410 provided for a 100% deduction for dividends received from an 80%-owned insurance company.
The corporation receives a dividend-received deduction of 100 percent of the deductible dividend percentage computed in accordance with Sec.
But dividends for cash cow Microsoft are easy: The company doesn't need to sink all of its earnings into R&D or acquisitions.
In mid-'99, Applied Signal Technology, a Sunnyvale, CA, maker of digital signal processing equipment for the defense industry, paid its first dividend of 25 cents per share annually.
It's not surprising that some of the biggest, most established firms have a history of rising dividend payments.
The proposed elimination of the dividend offset option seems to stem from a belief that recent changes in transfer pricing documentation requirements will soon eliminate the need for section 482 adjustments.
It accomplishes this by stating that no DRD will be allowed for dividends on stock not held for more than 45 days during the 90-day period beginning on a date that is 45 days before the "ax-dividend" date (the dine of demarcation for dividend entitlement).
The initial 1993 policy year dividend declaration anticipates an average return to policyholders of 17 percent.
Although management is cautiously optimistic that operating profitability can be reinstated in 2007, the immediate reinstatement of dividend payments remains uncertain.
965(b)(1) limits the dividend amount eligible for the repatriation DRD.
That is, corporate taxpayers were allegedly not entitled to any relief with respect to the taxes they had overpaid in the past as a result of New Mexico's unconstitutional scheme for taxing dividend income.
Corporate shareholders historically have preferred dividend treatment because of the availability of the corporate dividends-received deduction (DRD).
This represents a 5% increase in real terms over the annual dividends paid in respect of 1992 Realized Net Income, in line with the Company's 1993 dividend policy.
The pro rata dividend declaration is contingent on the completion of the merger prior to the next regularly scheduled dividend record date for Peoples Energy, which is March 22, 2007.