ditch

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Related to ditches: stitches

ditch (someone)

To leave, abandon, or purposefully lose someone. My little brother was being a real pest around me and my friends, so we decided to ditch him in the mall. I can't believe she ditched me to go hang out with her friends!
See also: ditch

ditch (some place)

To leave a place, especially one that is no longer of use or interest, generally in search of something better. Come on, let's ditch this place and go back to my house.
See also: ditch

ditch (something)

To throw away or abandon something. I was tired of carrying his bag for him, so I ditched it in a bush and went home. I had to ditch my car and walk into town after I ran out of gas.
See also: ditch

hurler on the ditch

A person who offers unsolicited criticism or advice about something in which they are not an active participant. Taken from the sport of hurling, a player of which is a hurler. Primarily heard in Ireland. All these people condemning the political process from social media, many of whom I'm sure don't vote, are just hurlers on the ditch in my opinion.
See also: ditch, on

keep it between the ditches

1. To drive safely; to stay on the road. (Usually said imperatively.) Whoa there, son. I know you're only just learning, but try to keep it between the ditches!
2. To behave properly or appropriately; to stay out of trouble or harm's way; keep to the straight and narrow. (Often said imperatively.) Okay, Bob, I'll see you after you're back from your trip. Keep it between the ditches now, you hear?
See also: ditch, keep

last-ditch attempt

A final effort or attempt to solve a problem or avoid failure or defeat, especially after a series of failures or setbacks. The home team is mounting one last-ditch attempt in the final seconds of the game to try to force an overtime showdown. In a last-ditch attempt to avoid a government shutdown, congress has pushed forward a new spending bill.
See also: attempt

the ox is in the ditch

The situation is dire and requires urgent and undivided attention to resolve it. Taken from the Bible (Luke 14), in which Jesus demonstrates to the Pharisees that some emergencies must be dealt with immediately, even if it means breaking the sabbath to do so. I was always taught to keep Sunday as a holy day, but you know as well as I do that if the ox is in the ditch, then you need to do what you can to make things right, no matter what day of the week it is! With our engine shot, stranded out on this desert highway, it seemed pretty clear to me that the ox was in the ditch.
See also: ditch, ox

ox-in-the-ditch

Of or relating to a situation that is dire and requires urgent and undivided attention to resolve it. Taken from the Bible (Luke 14), in which Jesus demonstrates to the Pharisees that some emergencies must be dealt with immediately, even if it means breaking the Sabbath to do so. I was going to miss the biggest meeting of the year, but my daughter's sickness was an ox-in-the-ditch situation.

last-ditch effort

A final effort or attempt to solve a problem or avoid failure or defeat, especially after a series of failures or setbacks. The home team is mounting one last-ditch effort in the final seconds of the game to try to force an overtime showdown. In a last-ditch effort to avoid a government shutdown, congress has pushed forward a new spending bill meant to plug the debt ceiling for another year.
See also: effort

last-ditch

Final, usually drastic or risky, with failure as the only alternative. The home team is mounting one last-ditch attempt in the final seconds of the game to try to force an overtime showdown. In a last-ditch effort to avoid a government shutdown, congress has pushed forward a new spending bill.

die in the last ditch

To die after fighting valiantly until the end. None of our troops will desert us—they're loyal and willing to die in the last ditch.
See also: die, ditch, last

*dull as dishwater

 and *dull as ditch water
very uninteresting. (*Also: as ~.) I'm not surprised that he can't find a partner. He's as dull as dishwater. Mr. Black's speech was as dull as dishwater.
See also: dishwater, dull

*last-ditch effort

Fig. a final effort; the last possible attempt. (*Typically: be ~; have ~; make ~.) I made one last-ditch effort to get her to stay. It was a last-ditch effort. I didn't expect it to work.
See also: effort

dull as dishwater

Boring, tedious, as in That lecture was dull as dishwater. The original simile, dull as ditchwater, dating from the 1700s, alluded to the muddy water in roadside ditches. In the first half of the 1900s, perhaps through mispronunciation, it became dishwater, that is, the dingy, grayish water in which dirty dishes had soaked.
See also: dishwater, dull

last-ditch effort

A desperate final attempt, as in We're making a last-ditch effort to finish on time. This expression alludes to the military sense of last ditch, "the last line of defense." Its figurative use dates from the early 1800s.
See also: effort

last-ditch

COMMON A last-ditch attempt or effort to do something is a final desperate try when everything else has failed. The President has been making a last-ditch attempt to prevent the rebels taking over the city. She gave up all claim on their house and his wealth in a last-ditch attempt to get him back. Note: In this expression, `ditch' means a trench (= long hole in the ground) which has been dug in order to defend a military position. The expression refers to soldiers who are prepared to die in a final effort to defend the position rather than surrender.

die in the last ditch

die desperately defending something; die fighting to the last extremity.
This expression comes from a remark attributed to King William III ( 1650–1702 ). Asked whether he did not see that his country was lost, he is said to have responded: ‘There is one way never to see it lost, and that is to die in the last ditch’. Last-ditch is often used as an adjective meaning ‘desperately resisting to the end’.
See also: die, ditch, last

dull as dishwater (or ditchwater)

extremely dull.
See also: dishwater, dull

a ˌlast-ditch ˈstand/atˈtempt/ˈeffort

a final attempt to avoid defeat: They are making a last-ditch stand to save the company.This is a last-ditch attempt to stop the strike. Ditch in this idiom refers to a long channel built to defend an area against attack.
See also: attempt, effort, stand

dull as dishwater

verb
See also: dishwater, dull

ditch

1. tv. to dispose of someone or something; to abandon someone or something. The crooks ditched the car and continued on foot.
2. tv. & in. to skip or evade someone or something. Pete ditched class today.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of all the seven ditches monitored in this study, ditch 8 appeared to be most directly impacted by point sources.
This suggested that we could use these ditches as one tool in managing agriculture from an ecological perspective.
Instead, facilities should plan on stabilizing roadside ditches with a slow-growing, hearty grass, which sets a root mat in the top few inches of the soil and tolerates mowing.
As work begins to block the ditches, we will begin the longer process of monitoring to see how much, if any, carbon is given off into the atmosphere.
You don't even have to know where a deer is going or where it's coming from to hunt ditches effectively.
The report quoted the municipality as saying that it received a total of 715 complaints about ditches during Ramadan and dealt with them, making it a 100 percent accomplishment.
Hage: About four months after I had first filed my taking claim with the court, the United States brought criminal charges against me for cleaning vegetation out of my irrigation ditches.
Officials say 3,000 to 4,000 people live in areas of west Lancaster, west Palmdale and Quartz Hill, where property owners two years ago voted down joining the district and where storm basins, ditches and other sites of standing water aren't sprayed to kill mosquito larvae.
The find, next to Icknield Street, the Roman road, includes remains of timber buildings, ditches and pebble surfaces.
It was the first of three irrigation ditches installed in 1870 in northern Colorado by members of the Union Colony, an agricultural community that would later be renamed Greeley, after Horace Greeley, the founder of the New York Tribune.
But beavers have plugged up one of the ditches, so this area has flooded.
USDA Agricultural Research Service scientists at the National Sedimentation Laboratory in Oxford, Mississippi, have determined that vegetated drainage ditches can help farmers reduce the amount of chemicals and sediment carried by stormwater from fields into nearby bodies of water.
Irrigation ditches have been misleading and killing trout across the West for decades, yet no one does anything about the problem.
This study was performed to monitor the metamorphosis of Bufo valliceps from roadside ditches treated with a mosquito larvicide containing methoprene, an insect growth regulator (IGR), to determine if this chemical is a cause of anuran malformations in the field.