ditch

(redirected from ditch somewhere)

ditch (someone)

To leave, abandon, or purposefully lose someone. My little brother was being a real pest around me and my friends, so we decided to ditch him in the mall. I can't believe she ditched me to go hang out with her friends!
See also: ditch

ditch (some place)

To leave a place, especially one that is no longer of use or interest, generally in search of something better. Come on, let's ditch this place and go back to my house.
See also: ditch

ditch (something)

To throw away or abandon something. I was tired of carrying his bag for him, so I ditched it in a bush and went home. I had to ditch my car and walk into town after I ran out of gas.
See also: ditch

hurler on the ditch

A person who offers unsolicited criticism or advice about something in which he or she is not an active participant. Taken from the sport of hurling, a player of which is a hurler. Primarily heard in Ireland. All these people condemning the political process from social media, many of whom I'm sure don't vote, are just hurlers on the ditch in my opinion.
See also: ditch, on

keep it between the ditches

1. To drive safely; to stay on the road. (Usually said imperatively.) Whoa there, son. I know you're only just learning, but try to keep it between the ditches!
2. To behave properly or appropriately; to stay out of trouble or harm's way; keep to the straight and narrow. (Often said imperatively.) Okay, Bob, I'll see you after you're back from your trip. Keep it between the ditches now, you hear?
See also: ditch, keep

last-ditch attempt

A final effort or attempt to solve a problem or avoid failure or defeat, especially after a series of failures or setbacks. The home team is mounting one last-ditch attempt in the final seconds of the game to try to force an overtime showdown. In a last-ditch attempt to avoid a government shutdown, congress has pushed forward a new spending bill.

the ox is in the ditch

The situation is dire and requires urgent and undivided attention to resolve it. Taken from the Bible (Luke 14), in which Jesus demonstrates to the Pharisees that some emergencies must be dealt with immediately, even if it means breaking the sabbath to do so. I was always taught to keep Sunday as a holy day, but you know as well as I do that if the ox is in the ditch, then you need to do what you can to make things right, no matter what day of the week it is! With our engine shot, stranded out on this desert highway, it seemed pretty clear to me that the ox was in the ditch.
See also: ditch, ox

ox-in-the-ditch

Of or relating to a situation that is dire and requires urgent and undivided attention to resolve it. Taken from the Bible (Luke 14), in which Jesus demonstrates to the Pharisees that some emergencies must be dealt with immediately, even if it means breaking the sabbath to do so. I was going to miss the biggest meeting of the year, but my daughter's sickness was an ox-in-the-ditch situation.

last-ditch effort

A final effort or attempt to solve a problem or avoid failure or defeat, especially after a series of failures or setbacks. The home team is mounting one last-ditch effort in the final seconds of the game to try to force an overtime showdown. In a last-ditch effort to avoid a government shutdown, congress has pushed forward a new spending bill meant to plug the debt ceiling for another year.
See also: effort

*dull as dishwater

 and *dull as ditch water
very uninteresting. (*Also: as ~.) I'm not surprised that he can't find a partner. He's as dull as dishwater. Mr. Black's speech was as dull as dishwater.
See also: dishwater, dull

*last-ditch effort

Fig. a final effort; the last possible attempt. (*Typically: be ~; have ~; make ~.) I made one last-ditch effort to get her to stay. It was a last-ditch effort. I didn't expect it to work.
See also: effort

last-ditch

a last-ditch attempt to solve a problem is the final attempt that you make after you have failed several times to solve it (always before noun) The gesture has been seen by many as a last-ditch attempt to win voters. The UN is trying to secure talks between the two sides in a last-ditch effort to avert war.

dull as dishwater

Boring, tedious, as in That lecture was dull as dishwater. The original simile, dull as ditchwater, dating from the 1700s, alluded to the muddy water in roadside ditches. In the first half of the 1900s, perhaps through mispronunciation, it became dishwater, that is, the dingy, grayish water in which dirty dishes had soaked.
See also: dishwater, dull

last-ditch effort

A desperate final attempt, as in We're making a last-ditch effort to finish on time. This expression alludes to the military sense of last ditch, "the last line of defense." Its figurative use dates from the early 1800s.
See also: effort

dull as dishwater

verb
See also: dishwater, dull

ditch

1. tv. to dispose of someone or something; to abandon someone or something. The crooks ditched the car and continued on foot.
2. tv. & in. to skip or evade someone or something. Pete ditched class today.
References in periodicals archive ?
She's probably been left lying in a ditch somewhere, looking like she's drunk.
One second you can be going for the finish and about to win a race, and the next moment you're lying in a ditch somewhere with broken bones," Froome said.
Well it would be, if it weren't for the tiny detail that Peter's actually married to Leanne and that she's currently doing her nut over worrying that he's dead in a ditch somewhere.
Well it would be, if it weren't for the fact that Peter is married to Leanne and that she's worrying that he's dead in a ditch somewhere.
A flabbergasted local resident, said: "The car appears to have been there all night and we wondered what happened to the driver, hoping that he was not injured in a ditch somewhere.
We either thought he had been knocked down and he was in a ditch somewhere, or he had gone off with somebody.
But he wasn't departing at hometime to rest his weary head in a ditch somewhere, he left to climb aboard his narrowboat.
And if they could've and didn't there's going to be hell to pay if she turns up in a ditch somewhere - cops reckon underworld bigwigs will pay millions to have her whacked, as the saying goes.
There is an enormous distance between ending up dead in a ditch somewhere and the sorts of things Rod Hagen writes about and I have experienced, but it's all connected.
Lance McKay pummels the Blair Witch Ditch somewhere in deep Maryland.
If Labour want to win the next election, I suggest they get the bozo in charge of this think tank - and dump him in a ditch somewhere.
One budding philosopher interviewed for a TV news show believed that getting smashed and waking up in a ditch somewhere was a kind of teuchter pre-destination.
We'll also receive proper compensation if they die, instead of having to dump their bodies in a ditch somewhere and letting the council sort it out.
I can't describe the pain I'm feeling to think my girl could be lying in a ditch somewhere.
Mr Sherry, of George Hodgkinson Close, Tile Hill, Coventry, said: "I am holding on to a bit of hope but I can't help thinking she's lying in a ditch somewhere.