abuse of distress

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Related to distress: destress, Emotional distress, psychological distress

abuse of distress

The wrongful or unlawful use or sale of property that has been seized in order to force payment or the performance of some contractual obligation (known in law as the process of distress or distrain). It was a clear case of abuse of distress: the landlord, without a court order, changed the locks on the door and then seized and sold the tenants' belongings only an hour after serving them a notice of eviction.
See also: abuse, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Research by Silen et al found that which of the following is a key contributor to moral distress in neuroscience nursing?
To date, few studies have examined distress from SITs in either clinical or non-clinical populations.
The moral distress scale measures perceptions of nurses on two dimensions of each situation: (1) intensity of moral distress and (2) frequency of the encounter of that particular situation using a 0-6 Likert scale.
In young adults already experiencing distress, the fewer hours they sleep the worse the outcome across the range of sleep hours," said lead author Dr.
These guidelines are based on a number of US and international standards that seek to eliminate pain and distress in such animals or at least reduce it as much as possible unless scientifically justified.
Because these acts were violations of the whistle-blower statutes, NYANG was ordered to pay the taxpayer damages in the amount of $70,000: $45,000 on account of her emotional distress or mental anguish and $25,000 for the injury to her professional reputation.
The court found that the awards (emotional distress and injury to professional reputation) were clearly for nonphysical injuries and ruled against her on this issue.
The Eighth Circuit ruled that these were symptoms of emotional distress, not physical sickness.
Hull's statement, however, is that being a healthcare worker in Toronto at the time of SARS, rather than being placed into quarantine, was responsible for the psychological distress that we measured.
Second, the authors provide a brief overview of the Demand-Control-Support model (Karasek & Theorell, 1990) as a method of understanding the development of distress in a detrimental person-environment match.
If the Chinese economy blows up tomorrow, then the source of 80 percent of export growth in 2003 could drag Japan back into recession, and drop the banks back into distress, but at the moment that does not look too likely.
A full-term baby boy born during an uncomplicated cesarean section was noted to have moderate respiratory distress soon after delivery.
com, which monitors properties in financial distress, found that while foreclosures are down in Los Angeles and Riverside counties, ``we're seeing price growth in those markets that is just not sustainable,'' company President Alexis McGee said.
Therapeutic Intervention with Poor, Unorganized Families: From Distress to Hope.
Volunteers completed questionnaires on perceived benefits from having breast cancer and on emotional distress in the past week.