dig in


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Related to dig in: dig into

dig in

 (to something )
1. Lit. to use a shovel to penetrate a mass of something. He dug into the soft soil and made a hole for the roots of the bush. He grabbed a shovel and dug in where he thought the tree ought to go.
2. Fig. to begin to process something; to go to work on something. I have to dig into all these applications today and process at least half of them. fed got out the stack of unanswered mail and dug in.
3. Fig. to begin to eat food. We dug into the huge pile of fried chicken. I stuck the corner of my napkin in my collar and dug in.
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dig someone or something in something

to poke someone or something in something, such as the ribs, the side, the cheek, etc. He dug Wally in the ribs as he finished telling the joke. Jed dug the cow in its side with a stick, trying to make it move into the barn.
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dig in

to start eating, esp. with enthusiasm Jack tossed some salt and pepper on the omelet and dug in.
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dig in

1. Excavate trenches to defend oneself in battle and hold one's position, as in The battalion dug in and held on. This usage gained currency in the trench warfare of World War I. [Mid-1800s]
2. Also, dig in one's heels. Adopt a firm position, be obstinate and unyielding. For example, Arthur refused to argue the point and simply dug in, or The dog dug in its heels and refused to move. [Colloquial; late 1800s]
3. Begin to work intensively, as in If we all dig in it'll be done before dark. [Colloquial; second half of 1800s]
4. Also, dig into. Begin to eat heartily, as in Even before all the food was on the table they began to dig in, or When the bell rang, the kids all dug into their lunches. [Colloquial; early 1900s]
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dig in

v.
1. To plunge the hands into something, especially to search for something: Dig in your pockets for some change.
2. To push something into some other thing: The robbers dug a gun in my back and demanded my wallet.
3. To dig trenches for protection: The troops dug in and waited for the enemy to attack.
4. To hold on to something stubbornly, as to a position; entrench oneself: The two sides have dug in and refuse to compromise.
5. To begin to work intensively: I gathered all the materials for the project and dug in.
6. To begin to eat heartily: As soon as everyone got their food, we dug in.
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