differ


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beg to differ (with someone)

Fig. to disagree with someone; to state one's disagreement with someone in a polite way. (Usually used in a statement made to the person being disagreed with.) I beg to differ with you, but you have stated everything exactly backwards. If I may beg to differ, you have not expressed my position as well as you seem to think.
See also: beg, differ

differ from something

[for something] to be different from something else. No, this one differs from the one you saw because it has a bigger handle. How does this one differ from that one?
See also: differ

differ in something

[for people or things] to be different in a specific way or in specific ways. They differ only in the color of their eyes and the size of their shoes. They differ in size and shape.
See also: differ

differ (with someone) about something

 and differ (with someone) on something 
1. [for someone] to disagree with someone about something. I must differ with you about that. We differ about that. I don't differ with you on that point.
2. [for someone] to argue with someone about something. Tom was differing with Terry rather loudly about which one of them was going to carry the flag. Let's stop differing with each other on these simple things!
See also: differ

Tastes differ.

Prov. Different people like different things. Fred: Bill always goes out with such stupid girls. I can't understand why. Alan: Tastes differ.
See also: differ, Taste

beg to differ (with somebody)

(slightly formal) also beg to disagree (with somebody)
to have a different opinion Some people think losing that game brought the team together, but I beg to differ - the team has always been together. Many believe our planet is in danger, but I beg to disagree - it's not our planet but human existence that's in danger.
See also: beg, differ

I beg to differ/disagree

  (formal)
a polite way of saying that you disagree with something that someone has said I beg to differ with Mr Stahl's final assertion.
See also: beg, differ

beg to differ

Disagree with someone, as in John told me Max was sure to win, but I beg to differ-I don't think he has a chance. This courteous formula for expressing disagreement echoes similar uses of beg in the sense of "ask," such as I beg your pardon, so used since about 1600. Also see excuse me.
See also: beg, differ

differ from

v.
To have qualities that are not the same as those of something else: My results differed from the results of everyone else who conducted the experiment. Sopranos differ from altos in having higher voices.
See also: differ

beg to differ

To disagree in a polite manner.
See also: beg, differ
References in classic literature ?
Things are said to be named 'equivocally' when, though they have a common name, the definition corresponding with the name differs for each.
Seedlings from the same fruit, and the young of the same litter, sometimes differ considerably from each other, though both the young and the parents, as Muller has remarked, have apparently been exposed to exactly the same conditions of life; and this shows how unimportant the direct effects of the conditions of life are in comparison with the laws of reproduction, and of growth, and of inheritance; for had the action of the conditions been direct, if any of the young had varied, all would probably have varied in the same manner.
and it is really surprising to note the endless points in structure and constitution in which the varieties and sub-varieties differ slightly from each other.
Domestic races of the same species, also, often have a somewhat monstrous character; by which I mean, that, although differing from each other, and from the other species of the same genus, in several trifling respects, they often differ in an extreme degree in some one part, both when compared one with another, and more especially when compared with all the species in nature to which they are nearest allied.
In regard to ducks and rabbits, the breeds of which differ considerably from each other in structure, I do not doubt that they all have descended from the common wild duck and rabbit.
Lastly, in certain breeds, the males and females have come to differ to a slight degree from each other.
And if, I said, the male and female sex appear to differ in their fitness for any art or pursuit, we should say that such pursuit or art ought to be assigned to one or the other of them; but if the difference consists only in women bearing and men begetting children, this does not amount to a proof that a woman differs from a man in respect of the sort of education she should receive; and we shall therefore continue to maintain that our guardians and their wives ought to have the same pursuits.
Men and women alike possess the qualities which make a guardian; they differ only in their comparative strength or weakness.
Next, we shall ask our opponent how, in reference to any of the pursuits or arts of civic life, the nature of a woman differs from that of a man?
What is called perception differs from sensation by the fact that the sensational ingredients bring up habitual associates--images and expectations of their usual correlates--all of which are subjectively indistinguishable from the sensation.
It differs from the sense of familiarity by being cognitive; it is a belief or judgment, which the sense of familiarity is not.
It is immediate, not inferred, not abstract; it differs from perception mainly by being referred to the past.
For example, a sound that we have just heard is present to us in a way which differs both from the sensation while we are hearing the sound and from the memory-image of something heard days or weeks ago.
The earliest version of "Tamerlane" was included in the suppressed volume of 1827, but differs very considerably from the poem as now published.
Man's free will differs from every other force in that man is directly conscious of it, but in the eyes of reason it in no way differs from any other force.