die back


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die back

[for vegetation] to die back to the stems or roots. The hedge died back in the winter but regenerated leaves in the spring. This kind of grass dies back every year.
See also: back, die

die back

v.
To be affected by the gradual dying of plant shoots, starting at the tips and working back, as a result of weather conditions, natural growth cycle, or disease: Aerate the soil weekly when the flowers bloom and until they die back.
See also: back, die
References in periodicals archive ?
They die back to their roots in the winter but do not have to be lifted like their smaller cousins.
Once they die back, their space will be easily colonised by your other border plants.
It stresses out the root system, the scaffolding branches die back, and the tree dies.
Outside, dianthus tend to spread outwards via runners and die back in winter.
Hopefully, if you planted them in a timely manner, winter squashes and gourds will be ready for use and display as their foliage succumbs to mildew and the vines die back.
After flowering, I would simply remove the flower head as you don't want the plant to put energy into producing seeds - just let the stalk die back which will feed the bulb.
Sometimes, a cane will turn black at the top and die back slowly to its base.
During a cold snap, the butterfly bush will die back nearly to its roots, but regrow with great vigor when spring arrives.
Phytophthora typically kills its host slowly: You will see individual branches die back, perhaps over many years, before the plant in question finally succumbs.
p 2 Deadhead roses - don't just pinch off the dead flower as this will cause the stem to go brown and die back.
Being an herbaceous perennial, its leaves fade and die back periodically, but its strong, bulb-like rhizomes will send up new leaves soon enough.
As a result, these iceplants experience die back, in patches, and regularly require replacement planting.
One caveat: CPs that are cold-hardy go dormant during the winter, will probably die back to the ground at this time and should not be fertilized or forced into growth until warm weather returns in the spring.
Dying daffodils can be deadheaded but leave green foliage to die back completely.
During training, astronauts are asked to think about such things as how they might react if a loved one were to die back on Earth.