die away


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die away

Fig. to fade away. The sound of the waterfall finally died away. When the applause died away, the tenor sang an encore.
See also: away, die

die away

Also, die down. Gradually diminish, fade, or subside; slowly come to an end. For example, As they moved higher up, their voices died away, or The rain seems to be dying down. The first term, from the late 1600s, today is most often applied to a diminishing sound and was originally used to describe the wind slowing down or ceasing to blow. The variant dates from the first half of the 1800s.
See also: away, die
References in periodicals archive ?
When the blooms die away can we reuse those bulbs, and how should they be handled?
Restrained muted strings filled the hall with lovely rounded sound, the rich dark phrases eventually daring to die away to a mere whisper.
With the fall of communism, rising pay and many doctors in lucrative private practices, many hoped that these under-the-table payments would die away.
PA WeatherCentre forecaster Jeremy Plester said: 'Over the next 24 hours the snow showers will die away.
They are all that's wrong and evil in skateboarding and they need to go and die away from me.
These programs seem to come and go as companies start out with good intentions and then die away when the cash runs out (Rest in peace, Napster).
And every friend I saw in the few days I was there carried someone with him, some echo that refused to die away or a virus that carried in its very genes the imprint of yet another corpse, the pathogen of yet another spasm of need, met somewhere.
He explains that while a combination of greater military control over troop movements and an increased reliance on force to coerce tax payments had helped quell some forms of these revolts, it ultimately took the disappearance of the "old social order" to cause recourse to such rioting to die away (242).