dicey

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a bit dicey

Carrying a certain degree of risk or danger; uncertain of a favorable outcome. This street looks a bit dicey, I think we should walk another way home. This merger deal could be a bit dicey for the company.
See also: bit, dicey

dicey

(ˈdɑɪsi)
mod. touchy; chancy; touch and go. Things are just a little dicey right now.
References in periodicals archive ?
Passage in the Senate is a lot dicier, in case you're in a letter-writing mood.
The green issue is even dicier, since not only is the consumer buying with her pocketbook, but she's buying with her conscience.
Abbas looks a lot dicier now than it did 17 months ago, or even 17 days ago.
Things, however, become dicier for the Democrats when it comes to particulars.
The situation was even dicier when coalition forces were configured into the equation.
There are lots of twists to option ARMs, such as letting customers choose how much to pay each month, just paying interest or--an even dicier option--making a low minimum payment, as with a credit-card bill.
Far dicier than money market accounts and 30-year Treasury bonds, buying wine options is similar to buying call options on the stock exchange--you're speculating on future value while absorbing considerable risk as a wine matures and comes to market.
Things get dicier when Marc comes around, accuses William of having an affair with Anna, and then says it's all right, provided that William and Anna conduct their lovemaking in the couple's home, with Marc's full knowledge.
investment, it is much dicier to presume that there will be a common
However, a return to the States, where all his best form has been, could work the oracle, though the weather threatens to be even dicier there, with ferocious thunderstorms forecast for Friday.
Try to make the drive at night, and it gets even dicier.
What they don't say is that the guesswork is dicier because in many cases cash doesn't change hands in Internet ad deals; many ads appear as a result of trade and barter arrangements, cross-promotions among allied sites and outright giveaways to fill up space.
This ever-dicey problem of corporate succession is made yet dicier when encountered in a family business.