detract from


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detract from (someone or something)

To impact someone or something negatively; to diminish someone or something. Unfortunately, that outdated kitchen detracts from the overall value of your house. His lies detracted from his otherwise stellar record as a senator.
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detract from someone or something

to lessen or diminish someone or something. The large pieces of furniture detracted from the lovely design in the carpet. Alice's quiet demeanor did not detract from her grace and beauty.
See also: detract

detract from

v.
To reduce a quality, importance, or some other value; diminish something: The dent on the side of the car detracts from its overall value. The politician's uneven voting record detracted from his chances of winning the election.
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References in periodicals archive ?
But these points only hint at the desirability of further research on a very worthy topic and do not detract from the contribution made by this book to the comparative study of state-minority relations as well as the study of Iranian post-revolutionary politics.
The time spent performing consultations would not detract from other important activities.
One of the dangers of writing down a universal theory of gravity, as Einstein did with his general relativity, is that it lies open for any obscure object in the universe to detract from it.
These numbers significantly detract from a species already under stress from marine pollution, habitat loss, entanglements with fishing gear, ocean noise and global climate change.
Yet this dutiful genuflection toward the self-critical image does little to detract from the fact that these mildly disconcerting, flickering pictures are visually lush and intensely seductive, and O'Malley also acknowledges that the distancing mechanism of the double framing within these works may have the paradoxical effect of actually intensifying "the aura of the original moment" rather than diminishing it.
These mistakes detract from the credibility of the book - the authors are from Arizona - perhaps they didn't spend enough weekends in Southern California.
Some listeners may have a few quibbles with Aragorn's lisp, which can detract from his "kingliness," and Frodo's tendency to snarl rather than to be nobly long-suffering, but overall this is a splendid production and, like NPR's enjoyable version, also an excellent alternative for the aural learner.
While Gabriel's Story is complete with solid character development and a plausible story line, it becomes mired with unimportant details that detract from the main event of any situation.
Taxes invariably will contribute to, or detract from, the benefits promised to shareholders and Wall Street analysts.
But its notoriety should not detract from some very important achievements.
Furthermore, Steven Hall & Partners feels that adding the risk of liability will detract from the primary purpose of the letter, namely to encourage open communication from the Committee to the stockholders.
Outdoor markets, Morgan said, tend to improve rather than detract from surrounding businesses by bringing people who might not otherwise shop in the area.
Placed outside the swell of the hull are some debatable sculptures (including a Pegasus with harps for wings), but even such moments of earnest Eastern European kitsch cannot detract from the essential drama and dignity of Vadasz's heroic pavilion.
This does not detract from the fact that Borghi's irony can lead to serious reflection, for example, on ecological urgencies: The Strauss waltzes played at full volume in the exhibition space referred explicitly to the currently catastrophic condition of the Danube.
More important, intrashareholder agreements, in which voting power was ceded through proxy arrangements, were considered harmless because they did not detract from the required voting power.