derring-do


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derring-do

Heroic, brave, or daring deeds or spirit, especially when referring to swordplay or other action-adventure scenarios. The sailor, with great derring-do, leapt from the crow's nest of the ship with his sword in his teeth, pouncing on the pirate captain.

derring do

Heroically brave exploits. “Derring” comes from “daring, and “do” is related to “done.” Geoffrey Chaucer originated the phrase in his poem Troilus and Criseyde; it was picked up by Edmund Spenser and again by Sir Walter Scott in Ivanhoe. If you come across it in contemporary speed or writing, you're more than likely to hear it in the longer phrase “deeds of derring do.”
See also: derring
References in periodicals archive ?
Derring-Do became a successful stallion and his best son, Huntercombe, came from his first crop.
She delves into the internal anguish and "o payor da morte" (fear of death) that night in and night out the young bride must conceal while she choreographs, with ample gestures and enchanting nuances, those scenarios of irresistible derring-dos and mischievous knavery that, she hopes, might mesmerize her husband into relinquishing his odious decree.
North Korean president Kim Jong-il thinks nothing of telling his people improbable tales of his derring-dos, including a debut round of gol f in the capital, Pyongyang, that yielded 11 holes in one and a round of 34-under par.
This time, he is leaving nothing to chance - the curtains will remain drawn at his home in Edinburgh, the telly and radio will be switched off and he'll immerse himself in Jack Ryan's latest derring-dos in Debt of Honour.