deny

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deny (one)self

To deprive oneself of something. I'm denying myself desserts right now, while I'm on this diet.
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justice delayed is justice denied

Justice served at a later time has as little impact as justice not being served at all. A: "We need to get this matter before a judge quickly." B: "Of course. Justice delayed is justice denied."
See also: delay, deny, justice

deny (something) to (someone or something)

To keep one from doing, having, or accessing something. I would never deny a great opportunity to you! You should follow your dreams! They don't want to get divorced and deny a stable home to their children.
See also: deny

deny someone or something to someone

to prevent someone from having someone or something. Would you deny her children to her after all these long months? I would not deny food to a starving man.
See also: deny
References in periodicals archive ?
First, due process does not shield officers from discipline for falsely denying misconduct allegations.
So even though the court found no compelling state interest to justify denying homosexuals the protection of marriage - nor has any court in similar cases - it nevertheless managed to find a safe and, many would argue, legally sound route to deflect any constitutional challenge to the status quo.
In September, another judge accused state parole officials of denying Robert Rosenkrantz due process and ordered his release before Davis stepped in.
Caiaphas was the second heretic, the first Arian, denying Christ's divinity.
President Clinton could not have believed he was telling ``the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth'' while denying a sexual relationship with Lewinsky.
Denying he understood the legal definition of ``sexual relations'' during the Jones case.
The inmate alleged that the sheriff carried out a policy of denying or delaying needed medical care for cost-savings reasons.
But now lawyers for the plaintiffs in that suit have gone back to court, claiming Parks is failing to fulfill the terms of the settlement, denying more than 60 renewal requests and more than 100 applications for new permits.
The district court noted that a prisoner may be denied out-of-cell exercise under what is termed a "safety exception,' hut that a blanket policy denying such prisoners any opportunity for out-of-cell exercise could not be justified.
The confusion is the unintended consequence of the changes in the federal welfare laws, which allow states to continue Medicaid to some legal immigrants while denying coverage to others.
The district court noted that a prisoner may be denied out-of-cell exercise under what is termed a "safety exception," but that a blanket policy denying such prisoners any opportunity for out-of-cell exercise could not be justified.