deny (one)self

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deny (one)self

To deprive oneself of something. I'm denying myself desserts right now, while I'm on this diet.
See also: deny
References in classic literature ?
Hence the wife often puts on fits of love and jealousy, nay, even denies herself any pleasure, to disturb and prevent those of her husband; and he again, in return, puts frequent restraints on himself, and stays at home in company which he dislikes, in order to confine his wife to what she equally detests.
Washington, Nov 15 (ANI): Miranda Kerr has revealed that she never denies herself anything although she tries to eat healthily the majority of the time.
In the brief moment her father is left unattended he dies of asphyxia and the remorseful Sophia denies herself the chance to continue her education as an act of penance.
Although Cleo rightly rejects negative feminine gender traits--passivity, cooperation, and the limiting domestic sphere--at the same time she denies herself any of the positive "human" attributes that are associated with these roles: a loving relationship with any of her family members, a satisfying sexual relationship with her husband, and the confidence to stop controlling her world and instead to live truly in that world.
Here again, in her desire to own and control people as though they are assets in a business world, Cleo denies herself the capability to love and be loved in her own family.
She denies herself the right to present her German mother as a victim, fearing she might minimize the incomparable suffering of the real victims, Jews like Jakob and his mother.
The big have-not for Xuela is love; it is a commodity denied her as a child and one she denies herself as a woman.
Overindulgence in anything is verboten, even though, when it comes to food, she denies herself nothing she really wants.
While she admits that the two figures are sometimes interchangeable, by emphasizing the importance of "safe" feminine places and by gradually reducing Simmel's stranger to one of masculine alienation (using Wright as the example), she denies herself an opportunity to investigate the complex kinds of black migration that occur within the city.