deck


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not playing with a full deck

1. Not mentally sound; crazy or mentally deranged. A: "Look at that guy talking to himself on the corner." B: "I reckon he's not playing with a full deck."
2. Not very bright or intelligent; dimwitted. Jim's a nice guy, but with some of the foolish things he does, I wonder if he's not playing with a full deck.
See also: deck, full, not, play

be one card shy of a (full) deck

To be not very intelligent or of questionable mental capacity. This expression can appear in many different forms and variations (e.g., "a few sandwiches short of a picnic," "one brick short of a load.," etc.). He says he's going to start a business selling bees as pets—I think he may be one card shy of a full deck. The new manager is nice enough, but he's one card shy of a deck, if you ask me.
See also: card, deck, of, one, shy

be several cards short of a (full) deck

To be not very intelligent or of questionable mental capacity. This expression can appear in many different forms and variations (e.g., "a few sandwiches short of a picnic," "one brick short of a load.," etc.). He says he's going to start a business selling bees as pets—I think he may be several cards short of a deck. The new manager is nice enough, but he's several cards short of a full deck, if you ask me.
See also: card, deck, of, several, short

several cards short of a (full) deck

A pejorative phrase meaning not very intelligent or of questionable mental capacity. This expression can appear in many different forms and variations (e.g., "a few sandwiches short of a picnic," "one brick short of a load.," etc.). He says he's going to start a business selling bees as pets—I think he may be several cards short of a deck. The new manager is nice enough, but he's several cards short of a full deck, if you ask me.
See also: card, deck, of, several, short

one card shy of a (full) deck

A pejorative phrase meaning not very intelligent or of questionable mental capacity. This expression can appear in many different forms and variations (e.g., "a few sandwiches short of a picnic," "one brick short of a load.," etc.). He says he's going to start a business selling bees as pets—I think he may be one card shy of a full deck. The new manager is nice enough, but he's one card shy of a deck, if you ask me.
See also: card, deck, of, one, shy

all hands on deck

1. A call for all members of a ship's crew to come to the deck, usually in a time of crisis. (A "hand" is a member of a ship's crew.) We're under attack! All hands on deck!
2. By extension, everyone available to help with a problem, or a call for those people to help. Your grandmother arrives tomorrow and the house is still a mess—I need all hands on deck to help me clean! All hands on deck! We've got to roll out this tarp before the rain starts. Now let's go!
See also: all, deck, hand, on

be one card short of a full deck

To be not very intelligent or of questionable mental capacity. This expression can appear in many different forms and variations (e.g., "a few sandwiches short of a picnic," "one brick short of a load.," etc.). He says he's going to start a business selling bees as pets—I think he may be one card short of a full deck. The new manager is nice enough, but he's one card short of a full deck, if you ask me.
See also: card, deck, full, of, one, short

be several cards short of a full deck

To be not very intelligent or of questionable mental capacity. This expression can appear in many different forms and variations (e.g., "a few sandwiches short of a picnic," "one brick short of a load.," etc.). He says he's going to start a business selling bees as pets—I think he may be several cards short of a full deck. The new manager is nice enough, but he's several cards short of a full deck, if you ask me.
See also: card, deck, full, of, several, short

clear the deck(s)

1. Literally, of sailors, to prepare for something (such as a battle) by removing or securing objects on the deck of a ship. That enemy ship is getting too close—clear the deck!
2. By extension, to cease doing something in preparation for a more important task or happening. I know you're busy with that paperwork, but clear the decks—I've got a big client coming in this afternoon.
3. To flee hastily; to depart quickly Uh oh, here comes mean old Mr. Jerome. Clear the decks, everyone! The staff cleared the decks when they saw the boss asking for volunteers to work on the weekend.
See also: clear

stack the deck (against) (someone or something)

To make arrangements that result in an unfair advantage over someone or something. (Likened to fixing a deck of playing cards in one's favor during a game.) By dating the boss's daughter, Jeremy has stacked the deck against the rest of us for an early promotion. The mega corporation has been accused of trying to stack the deck by spending millions to influence members of congress.
See also: deck, stack

deck out

1. To dress in an especially extravagant manner. A noun or pronoun can be used between "deck" and "out." Wow, you sure got decked out for the party tonight! Maybe I should have worn something nicer than jeans.
2. To decorate something lavishly or elaborately. A noun or pronoun can be used between "deck" and "out." Wow, you really decked out the house for the party tonight—I've never seen so many Christmas lights in my life!
See also: deck, out

hit the deck

1. To drop to the ground, usually in an attempt to avoid danger. All the soldiers hit the deck when the enemy plane flew overhead.
2. To get out of bed. It's already one in the afternoon—hit the deck!
See also: deck, hit

on deck

1. Literally, on the deck of a ship or boat. The crates on deck came loose in the storm and went flying overboard. The captain wants everyone on deck immediately.
2. Ready or available (to do something). We have a team of helpers on deck to make sure everyone here has a fantastic experience. Who do we have on deck to deal with the power outage?
3. In baseball or softball, next up to bat. Primarily heard in US. With their record-breaking batter on deck, the team is hoping to take the lead.
See also: deck, on

be not playing with a full deck

1. To not be mentally sound; to be crazy or mentally deranged. A: "Look at that guy talking to himself on the corner." B: "I reckon he's not playing with a full deck."
2. To not be very bright or intelligent; to be dimwitted. Jim's a nice guy, but with some of the foolish things he does, I wonder if he's not playing with a full deck.
3. To be acting deceptively (as if one is playing with a deck of cards after having removed some of the cards from the deck). I doubt that Brian's playing with a full deck—how could he win so much money without cheating?
See also: deck, full, not, play

cards are stacked against (one)

[informal] luck is against one. I have the worst luck. The cards are stacked against me all the time. How can I accomplish anything when the cards are stacked against me?
See also: card, stacked

clear the decks

 
1. Lit. [for everyone] leave the deck of a ship and prepare for action. (A naval expression urging seaman to stow gear and prepare for battle or other action.) An attack is coming. Clear the decks.
2. Fig. get out of the way; get out of this area. Clear the decks! Here comes the teacher. Clear the decks and take your seats.
See also: clear, deck

deck someone or something out (in something)

 and deck someone or something out (with something)
to decorate someone or something with something. Sally decked all her children out for the holiday party. She decked out her children in Halloween costumes. Tom decked the room out with garlands of flowers.
See also: deck, out

few bricks short of a load

 and few cards shy of a full deck; few cards short of a deck; not playing with a full deck; two bricks shy of a load
Fig. lacking in intellectual ability. (Many other variants.) Tom: Joe thinks he can build a car out of old milk jugs. Mary: I think Joe's a few bricks short of a load. Ever since she fell and hit her head, Jane's been a few bricks short of a load, if you know what I'm saying. Bob's nice, but he's not playing with a full deck. You twit! You're two bricks shy of a load.
See also: brick, few, load, of, short

have the cards stacked against (one)

 and have the deck stacked against one
Fig. to have one's chance at future success limited by factors over which one has no control; to have luck against one. You can't get very far in life if you have the deck stacked against you. I can't seem to get ahead. I always have the cards stacked against me.
See also: card, have, stacked

have the deck stacked against

one Go to have the cards stacked against one.
See also: deck, have, stacked

hit the deck

 
1. Fig. to fall down; to drop down to the floor or ground. Hit the deck. Don't let them see you. I hit the deck the minute I heard the shots.
2. Fig. to get out of bed. Come on, hit the deck! It's morning. Hit the deck! Time to rise and shine!
See also: deck, hit

on deck

 
1. Lit. on the deck of a boat or a ship. Everyone except the cook was on deck when the storm hit. Just pull up the anchor and leave it on deck.
2. Fig. ready (to do something); ready to be next (at something). Ann, get on deck. You're next. Who's on deck now?
See also: deck, on

play with a full deck

 
1. Lit. to play cards with a complete deck, containing all the cards. Are we playing with a full deck or did some card drop on the floor? I haven't seen the three of hearts all evening!
2. Fig. to operate as if one were mentally sound. (Usually in the negative. One cannot play cards properly with a partial deck.) That guy's not playing with a full deck. Look sharp, you dummies! Pretend you are playing with a full deck.
See also: deck, full, play

stack the deck (against someone or something)

 and stack the cards (against someone or something)
to arrange things against someone or something. (Originally from card playing; stacking the deck is to cheat by arranging the cards to be dealt out to one's advantage.) I can't get ahead at my office. Someone has stacked the cards against me. Do you really think that someone has stacked the deck? Isn't it just fate?
See also: deck, stack

cards are stacked against

Many difficulties face someone or something, as in The cards are stacked against the new highway project. This term originated in gambling, where to stack the cards or stack the deck means to arrange cards secretly and dishonestly in one's own favor or against one's opponent. [Mid-1800s]
See also: card, stacked

clear the decks

Prepare for action, as in I've finished all these memos and cleared the decks for your project, or Clear the decks-here comes the coach. This expression originated in naval warfare, when it described preparing for battle by removing or fastening down all loose objects on the ship's decks. [Second half of 1800s]
See also: clear, deck

deck out

Decorate, dress up, as in They were all decked out in their best clothes. [Mid-1700s]
See also: deck, out

hit the deck

Also, hit the dirt. Fall to the ground, usually for protection. For example, As the planes approached, we hit the deck, or We heard shooting and hit the dirt. In the early 1900s the first expression was nautical slang for "jump out of bed," or "wake up," and somewhat later, "get going." The current meaning dates from the 1920s.
See also: deck, hit

on deck

1. Available, ready for action, as in We had ten kids on deck to clean up after the dance. [Slang; second half of 1800s]
2. In baseball, scheduled to bat next, waiting near home plate to bat, as in Joe was on deck next. [1860s] Both usages allude to crew members being on the deck of a ship, in readiness to perform their duties.
See also: deck, on

be not playing with a full deck

mainly AMERICAN
If someone is not playing with a full deck, they are not being completely honest and therefore have an unfair advantage over other people. This guy is either very good or he's not playing with a full deck. Note: A deck of cards can have cards taken out before a game in order to give one player an advantage.
See also: deck, full, not, play

hit the deck

If someone or something hits the deck, they suddenly fall to the ground. `We'll have to get a doctor!' I hit the deck yowling. My hands were wrapped round my knees. Instead of pulling up, the plane seemed to go faster and faster before it hit the deck. Note: `Deck' normally means the floor of a ship or, in American English, a raised platform outside a house. Here it means the floor or ground.
See also: deck, hit

stack the deck

or

load the deck

mainly AMERICAN
If you stack the deck or load the deck, you give someone or something an unfair advantage or disadvantage. Mr Howard is doing all he can to stack the deck in favour of the status quo. We've developed a culture where it's really hard to eat well and exercise. We're kind of stacking the deck against ourselves. As you can see, I'm loading the deck so that we get the results we want. Note: A stacked or loaded deck of cards is one that has been altered before a game in order to give one player an advantage.
See also: deck, stack

clear the decks

mainly BRITISH or

clear the deck

AMERICAN
COMMON If someone clears the decks, they finish what they are doing so that they are ready to start doing something else. The British commanders had wanted to clear the decks for possible large-scale military operations. Clear the decks before you think of taking on any more responsibilities. Note: In the past, all unnecessary objects were cleared off the decks or floors of a warship before a battle, so that the crew could move around more easily.
See also: clear, deck

all hands on deck

mainly BRITISH
If a situation requires all hands on deck, it needs everyone to work hard to achieve an aim or do a task. Come on then, boys, all hands on deck tonight, we need all the help we can get. Your job was so big that we needed all hands on deck. Note: Members of a ship's crew are sometimes called hands and `deck' refers to the floor of a ship.
See also: all, deck, hand, on

clear the decks

prepare for a particular event or goal by dealing beforehand with anything that might hinder progress.
In the literal sense, clear the decks meant to remove obstacles or unwanted items from the decks of a ship before a battle at sea.
See also: clear, deck

hit the deck

fall to or throw yourself on the ground. informal
See also: deck, hit

not playing with a full deck

mentally deficient. North American informal
A deck in this phrase is a pack of playing cards.
See also: deck, full, not, play

on deck

ready for action or work. North American
This expression refers to a ship's main deck as the place where the crew musters to receive orders for action.
See also: deck, on

clear the ˈdeck(s)

get ready for some activity by first dealing with anything not essential to it: We had been doing some painting in the dining room, so we had to spend some time clearing the decks before our visitors came round in the evening.
See also: clear, deck

all ˌhands on ˈdeck

(also all ˌhands to the ˈpump) (saying, humorous) everyone helps or must help, especially in an emergency: There are 10 staff off sick this week, so it’s all hands on deck.When the kitchen staff became ill, it was all hands to the pump and even the manager did some cooking.
On a ship, a hand is a sailor.
See also: all, deck, hand, on

hit the ˈdeck

(informal)
1 fall to the ground suddenly: When we heard the shooting we hit the deck.The champion landed another heavy punch and the challenger hit the deck for the third time.
2 (American English) get out of bed: Come on! It’s time to hit the deck.
See also: deck, hit

deck

1. tv. to knock someone to the ground. Fred decked Bob with one blow.
2. n. a pack of cigarettes. Can you toss me a deck of fags, please?

hit the deck

1. tv. to get out of bed. Come on, hit the deck! It’s morning.
2. tv. to fall down; to drop down. I hit the deck the minute I heard the shots.
See also: deck, hit

play with a full deck

in. to operate as if one were mentally sound. (Usually in the negative. One cannot play cards with a partial deck.) Look sharp, you dummies! Pretend you are playing with a full deck.
See also: deck, full, play

stack the deck

tv. to arrange things secretly for a desired outcome. (From card playing where a cheater may arrange the order of the cards that are to be dealt to the players.) The president stacked the deck so I would be appointed head of the finance committee.
See also: deck, stack

clear the deck

Informal
To prepare for action.
See also: clear, deck

hit the deck

Slang
1. To get out of bed.
2. To fall or drop to a prone position.
3. To prepare for action.
See also: deck, hit

on deck

1. On hand; present.
2. Sports Waiting to take one's turn, especially as a batter in baseball.
See also: deck, on

play with a full deck

Slang
To be of sound mind: didn't seem to be playing with a full deck.
See also: deck, full, play
References in classic literature ?
Then I sprang toward the edge of the deck closest to the girl upon the sinking tug.
A single glance at the vessel's deck assured me that the battle was over and that we had been victorious, for I saw our survivors holding a handful of the enemy at pistol points while one by one the rest of the crew was coming out of the craft's interior and lining up on deck with the other prisoners.
Casting off its lashings he dragged it out from beneath the trees, and, mounting to the deck tested out the various controls.
His weight drew the craft slightly lower and at the very instant that the man drew himself to the deck at the bow of the vessel, the leading banth sprang for the stern.
Barricading the cabin door, they broke holes through the companion-way, and, with the muskets and ammunition which were at hand, opened a brisk fire that soon cleared the deck.
Those who mounted the deck met with no opposition; no one was to be seen on board; for Mr.
As Thurid came opposite the cabin's doorway a new element projected itself into the grim tragedy of the air that was being enacted upon the deck of Matai Shang's disabled flier.
With flushed face and disheveled hair, and eyes that betrayed the recent presence of mortal tears--above which this proud goddess had always held herself--she leaped to the deck directly before me.
And, halfway to the crosstrees and flattened against the rigging by the full force of the wind so that it would have been impossible for me to have fallen, the Ghost almost on her beam-ends and the masts parallel with the water, I looked, not down, but at almost right angles from the perpendicular, to the deck of the Ghost.
The second awoke as I touched him, and, though I succeeded in hurling him from the cruiser's deck, his wild cry of alarm brought the remaining pirates to their feet.
What saved Captain Duncan was a sailor with a deck mop on the end of a stick.
Even as he spoke, however, his head swirled round, and he fell to the deck with the blood gushing from his nose and mouth.
Those who were able to walk remained all the time on duty, lying about in the shadows of the main deck, till my voice raised for an order would bring them to their enfeebled feet, a tottering little group, mov- ing patently about the ship, with hardly a mur- mur, a whisper amongst them all.
He resumed his former position, and presently he was aware that she had arisen and was leaving the deck.
my first thought was that something had carried away aloft; but even as I went down, and before I struck the deck, I heard the devil's own tattoo of rifles from the boats, and twisting sidewise, I caught a glimpse of the sailor who was standing guard.