dealing

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Related to dealings: have dealings

deal (one) in

To include one in something. Often used in the imperative "deal me in." The phrase originated in card games, in which cards are distributed among the players by "dealing" them. If you guys are playing poker in there, deal me in! Bobby really wants to be involved in this project, so deal him in too.
See also: deal

deal a death blow

1. To hit or otherwise strike someone and cause immediate death. The warrior swiftly dealt a death blow to his adversary on the battlefield.
2. By extension, to cause the abrupt end of something. His arrest and subsequent conviction dealt a death blow to his successful career as an attorney. Despite the company's recent success, the massive recall dealt it a death blow.
See also: blow, deal, death

deal in (something)

1. To work in a particular field. I deal in medical supplies these days, selling X-ray and MRI machines to hospitals. Mike has been acting so secretive lately that I'm starting to think he's dealing in something illegal.
2. To focus on or include something. Your term paper for this class must deal in the major themes of modernism.
See also: deal

deal out

1. To distribute something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "deal" and "out." Deal out the itinerary so we can see which landmark we're visiting first.
2. To exclude one from something. The phrase is likely tied to card games, in which cards are distributed among the players by "dealing" them. In this usage, the excluded person is typically stated between "deal" and "out." If you guys are going to keep playing poker, then deal me out—I have to go home. Bobby isn't going to the conference anymore, so deal him out of this project.
See also: deal, out

deal something out

to pass something out piece by piece, giving everyone equal shares. The manager dealt the proposals out, giving each person an equal number to read. I'll deal out some more proposals.
See also: deal, out

*tough on someone

severe and demanding in dealing with someone. (*Typically: act ~; be ~; become ~; get~.) My boss is very tough on me, but I need the structure and discipline.
See also: on, tough

wheel and deal

to take part in clever (but sometimes dishonest or immoral) business deals. John loves to wheel and deal in the money markets. Jack got tired of all the wheeling and dealing of big business and retired to run a pub in the country.
See also: and, deal, wheel

deal out

1. Distribute, as in He dealt out more and more work. [Late 1300s] Also see deal in, def. 3.
2. deal someone out. Exclude someone, as in I don't have time for this project, so deal me out. This usage is the opposite of deal in, def. 3.
See also: deal, out

wheel and deal

Operate or manipulate for one's own interest, especially in an aggressive or unscrupulous way. For example, Bernie's wheeling and dealing has made him rich but not very popular. This term comes from gambling in the American West, where a wheeler-dealer was a heavy bettor on the roulette wheel and at cards. [Colloquial; c. 1940]
See also: and, deal, wheel

wheel and deal

If someone wheels and deals, they use a lot of different methods and contacts to achieve what they want in business or politics. He still wheels and deals around the globe. Note: This kind of activity can be called wheeling and dealing. He hates the wheeling and dealing associated with political life. Note: This expression is often used to show that you think someone is behaving dishonestly.
See also: and, deal, wheel

wheel and deal

engage in commercial or political scheming.
The verb wheel is here used to mean ‘control events’. The sense is related to the noun a big wheel , meaning ‘an important person who makes things happen’.
See also: and, deal, wheel

ˌwheel and ˈdeal

(disapproving) do a lot of complicated deals in business or politics, often in a dishonest way: He’s spent the last three years wheeling and dealing in the City.I don’t want to go into politics — there’s too much wheeling and dealing. ▶ ˌwheeler-ˈdealer noun
See also: and, deal, wheel

deal out

v.
1. To exclude someone from a card game by not giving that player cards: Deal me out—I have to go to the bathroom.
2. To distribute something to someone: The dealer dealt the cards out. The politician dealt out pamphlets explaining her position on the issues. Deal out another hand; I'm ready to play.
See also: deal, out

wheel and deal

in. to negotiate, cajole, and connive—aggressively. (see also wheeler-dealer.) If you can’t wheel and deal, you can’t run for elective office.
See also: and, deal, wheel

wheel and deal

Informal
To engage in the advancement of one's own interests, especially in a canny, aggressive, or unscrupulous way.
See also: and, deal, wheel
References in classic literature ?
Here,' he said, `I am very straightforward in my dealings -- take your choice.
Open an account to Hardwell in it; a quarter of all the shares I buy are to be in his name, and a quarter of all the profits I make in dealing in the shares is to be credited to him.
If you are asked questions as to why you are dealing in these shares to such an extent, you can say that the friend for whom you are acting desires to boom copper, and is going on the low price of the metal at the moment.
He had made them sit up and take notice, and now, willy-nilly, they were dealing him hands and clamoring for him to play.
1066 TO ABOUT 1350 [Footnote: Scott's 'Ivanhoe,' the best-known work of fiction dealing with any part of this period, is interesting, but as a picture of life at the end of the twelfth century is very misleading.
Miss Julia," continuing aloud, "my nature is all plain- dealing, and I am delighted to find a congenial spirit.
The sailing- ship, with her unthrobbing body, seemed to lead mysteriously a sort of unearthly existence, bordering upon the magic of the invisible forces, sustained by the inspiration of life-giving and death- dealing winds.
In the course of my next lesson, I made a report of the other devoirs, dealing out praise and blame in very small retail parcels, according to my custom, for there was no use in blaming severely, and high encomiums were rarely merited.
But perhaps Mills, with his penetration, understood very well the nature he was dealing with.
To pass from theological, and philosophical truth, to the truth of civil business; it will be acknowledged, even by those that practise it not, that clear, and round dealing, is the honor of man's nature; and that mixture of falsehoods, is like alloy in coin of gold and silver, which may make the metal work the better, but it embaseth it.
I'll just finish dealing, and then Ilyushka will come with his chorus.
Naturally enough this was a long poem in the terza rima of the "Divina Commedia," and dealing with a story of our civil war in a fashion so remote that no editor would print it.
But the entire range of heroic legend was open to these poets, and other clusters of epics grew up dealing particularly with the famous story of Thebes, while others dealt with the beginnings of the world and the wars of heaven.
In the present case, dealing with a projectile nine feet in diameter and fifteen feet long, it became necessary to bring the moon within an apparent distance of five miles at most; and for that purpose to establish a magnifying power of 48,000 times.
At dinner he talked a little to his wife about Moscow matters, and, with a sarcastic smile, asked her after Stepan Arkadyevitch; but the conversation was for the most part general, dealing with Petersburg official and public news.