References in classic literature ?
We used to have a good deal of this sort of crime in our literature, but it has gone out now.
He may, at times, be able to do a great deal more than he can at others.
Suppose a marriage, and the husband has ONLY $1,000 for his pocket, this would bring down the ways and means to $2,000 per annum; or less than a hundredth part of the expense of keeping ONE pocket-handkerchief; and when you come to include rent, fuel, marketing, and other necessaries, you see, my dear Miss Monson, there is a great deal of poetry in paying so much for a pocket-handkerchief.
Ryde preach a great deal more about that spiritual part of religion that you talk of, Adam?
There is a vast deal of difference in memories, as well as in everything else, and therefore you must make allowance for your cousin, and pity her deficiency.
The honor is not less for me," the young lady answered, "for I am sure monsieur has a great deal of taste.
With a great deal of quiet observation, and a knowledge, which she often wished less, of her father's character, she was sensible that results the most serious to his family from the intimacy were more than possible.
It is, however, a truly elegant city (very superior to New York), and I have spent a great deal of time in visiting the various monuments and palaces.
And yet I have heard that there is a great deal of wine drunk in Oxford.
I have read this work with a good deal of amusement, and upon this I congratulate myself, since it is colourless and dull.
His idea was to practise at the Bar (he chose the Chancery side as less brutal), and get a seat for some pleasant constituency as soon as the various promises made him were carried out; meanwhile he went a great deal to the opera, and made acquaintance with a small number of charming people who admired the things that he admired.
said Dolokhov with a side glance at Rostov as he continued to deal.
I could not say why "Harold the Dauntless" most took my fancy; the fine, strongly flowing rhythm of the verse had a good deal to do with it, I believe.
Still, beside, or only a little way beneath, such a picture of passing fashion, what Steele and his fellows really deal with is the least transitory aspects of life, though still merely aspects--those points in which all human nature, great or little, finds what it has in common, and directly shows itself up.
She is a foolish, good-natured little woman, who thinks herself clever because her husband has permitted her to travel a good deal, and has evidently been rather fascinated by the latitudinarianism of continental society.